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How to design and report experiments / Andy Field, Graham Hole

Main Author Field, Andy Coauthor Hole, Graham Country Estados Unidos. Edition [1st ed.] Publication Los Angeles : Sage, cop. 2003 Description XII, 384 p. : il. ; 25 cm ISBN 978-0-7619-7383-6 CDU 303.7 518.2
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 303.7 - F Available 472638
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

How to Design and Report Experiments is the perfect textbook and guide to the often bewildering world of experimental design and statistics. It provides a complete map of the entire process beginning with how to get ideas about research, how to refine your research question and the actual design of the experiment, leading on to statistical procedure and assistance with writing up of results.

While many books look at the fundamentals of doing successful experiments and include good coverage of statistical techniques, this book very importantly considers the process in chronological order with specific attention given to effective design in the context of likely methods needed and expected results. Without full assessment of these aspects, the experience and results may not end up being as positive as one might have hoped. Ample coverage is then also provided of statistical data analysis, a hazardous journey in itself, and the reporting of findings, with numerous examples and helpful tips of common downfalls throughout.

Combining light humour, empathy with solid practical guidance to ensure a positive experience overall, How to Design and Report Experiments will be essential reading for students in psychology and those in cognate disciplines with an experimental focus or content in research methods courses.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xi)
  • Part 1 Designing an Experiment (p. 1)
  • 1 Before You Begin (p. 3)
  • 1.1 Variables and Measurement (p. 5)
  • 1.2 Experimental versus Correlational Research (p. 10)
  • 1.3 The Dynamic Nature of Scientific Method (p. 27)
  • 1.4 Summary (p. 29)
  • 1.5 Practical Tasks (p. 29)
  • 1.6 Further Reading (p. 32)
  • 2 Planning an Experiment (p. 33)
  • 2.1 What Should I Research: Finding Out What's Been Done? (p. 33)
  • 2.2 How Do I Research My Question? (p. 37)
  • 2.3 Summary: Is That It? (p. 51)
  • 2.4 Practical Tasks (p. 52)
  • 2.5 Further Reading (p. 53)
  • 3 Experimental Designs (p. 54)
  • 3.1 The Three Aims of Research: Reliability, Validity and Importance (p. 54)
  • 3.2 Different Methods for Doing Research (p. 63)
  • 3.3 So, Which Experimental Design Should You Use? (p. 96)
  • 3.4 Ethical Considerations in Running a Study (p. 98)
  • 3.5 Summary (p. 101)
  • 3.6 Practical Tasks (p. 102)
  • 3.7 Further Reading (p. 104)
  • Part 2 Analysing and Interpreting Data (p. 107)
  • 4 Descriptive Statistics (p. 109)
  • 4.1 Populations and Samples (p. 109)
  • 4.2 Summarizing Data (p. 111)
  • 4.3 Confidence Intervals (p. 135)
  • 4.4 Reporting Descriptive Statistics (p. 136)
  • 4.5 Summary (p. 139)
  • 4.6 Practical Tasks (p. 140)
  • 4.7 Further Reading (p. 140)
  • 5 Inferential Statistics (p. 141)
  • 5.1 Testing Hypotheses (p. 141)
  • 5.2 Summary (p. 157)
  • 5.3 Practical Tasks (p. 157)
  • 5.4 Further Reading (p. 158)
  • 6 Parametric Statistics (p. 159)
  • 6.1 How Do I Tell If My Data are Parametric? (p. 159)
  • 6.2 The t-Test (p. 162)
  • 6.3 The Independent t-Test (p. 163)
  • 6.4 The Dependent t-Test (p. 168)
  • 6.5 Analysis of Variance (p. 172)
  • 6.6 One-Way Independent ANOVA (p. 174)
  • 6.7 One-Way Repeated Measures ANOVA (p. 183)
  • 6.8 Two Way Independent ANOVA (p. 191)
  • 6.9 Two-Way Mixed ANOVA (p. 201)
  • 6.10 Two-Way Repeated Measures ANOVA (p. 212)
  • 6.11 Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) (p. 223)
  • 6.12 Summary (p. 231)
  • 6.13 Practical Tasks (p. 231)
  • 6.14 Further Reading (p. 232)
  • 7 Non-parametric Statistics (p. 234)
  • 7.1 Non-Parametric Tests: Rationale (p. 234)
  • 7.2 The Mann-Whitney Test (p. 235)
  • 7.3 The Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test (p. 239)
  • 7.4 The Kruskal-Wallis Test (p. 244)
  • 7.5 Friedman's ANOVA (p. 250)
  • 7.6 Summary (p. 256)
  • 7.7 Practical Tasks (p. 256)
  • 7.8 Further Reading (p. 256)
  • 8 Choosing a Statistical Test (p. 258)
  • 8.1 The Need to Think About Statistics at the Outset of Designing a Study (p. 258)
  • 8.2 Five Questions to Ask Yourself (p. 265)
  • 8.3 Specific Sources of Confusion in Deciding Which Test to Use (p. 269)
  • 8.4 Examples of Using These Questions to Arrive at the Correct Test (p. 271)
  • 8.5 Summary (p. 277)
  • 8.6 Practical Tasks (p. 277)
  • Part 3 Writing Up Your Research (p. 285)
  • 9 A Quick Guide to Writing a Psychology Lab-Report (p. 287)
  • 9.1 An Overview of the Various Sections of a Report (p. 287)
  • 9.2 Title (p. 289)
  • 9.3 Abstract (p. 289)
  • 9.4 Introduction (p. 289)
  • 9.5 Method (p. 291)
  • 9.6 Results (p. 293)
  • 9.7 Discussion (p. 295)
  • 9.8 References (p. 298)
  • 10 General Points When Writing a Report (p. 301)
  • 10.1 The Standardized Format of the Report (p. 301)
  • 10.2 Some Important Considerations When Writing a Report (p. 303)
  • 10.3 Writing Style (p. 304)
  • 10.4 Give Yourself Enough Time (p. 307)
  • 10.5 Summary (p. 308)
  • 10.6 Practical Tasks (p. 309)
  • 10.7 Further Reading (p. 309)
  • 11 Answering the Question 'Why?' The Introduction Section (p. 311)
  • 11.1 Providing a Rationale (p. 311)
  • 11.2 How to Describe Previous Research and its Findings (p. 313)
  • 11.3 Outlining Your Own Experiment (p. 315)
  • 11.4 Providing Predictions About the Experiment's Outcome (p. 316)
  • 11.5 Summary (p. 317)
  • 11.6 Practical Tasks (p. 317)
  • 12 Answering the Question 'How?' The Method Section (p. 320)
  • 12.1 Design (p. 320)
  • 12.2 Participants (p. 321)
  • 12.3 Apparatus (p. 322)
  • 12.4 Procedure (p. 323)
  • 12.5 Summary (p. 324)
  • 12.6 Practical Tasks (p. 324)
  • 13 Answering the Question 'What Did I Find?' The Results Section (p. 327)
  • 13.1 Tidying Up Your Data (p. 327)
  • 13.2 Descriptive Statistics (p. 328)
  • 13.3 Inferential Statistics (p. 330)
  • 13.4 Make the Reader's Task Easy (p. 332)
  • 13.5 Be Selective in Reporting Your Results! (p. 333)
  • 13.6 Summary (p. 333)
  • 14 Answering the Question 'So What'? The Discussion Section (p. 336)
  • 14.1 Summarize Your Findings (p. 336)
  • 14.2 Relate Your Findings to Previous Research (p. 336)
  • 14.3 Discuss the Limitations of Your Study (p. 340)
  • 14.4 Make Suggestions for Further Research (p. 341)
  • 14.5 Draw Some Conclusions (p. 342)
  • 14.6 Summary (p. 342)
  • 15 Title, Abstract, References and Formatting (p. 343)
  • 15.1 The Title (p. 343)
  • 15.2 The Abstract (p. 344)
  • 15.3 References (p. 345)
  • 15.4 Appendices (p. 356)
  • 15.5 Practical Tasks (p. 357)
  • 16 Example of an Experimental Write-Up (p. 360)
  • 16.1 Abstract (p. 360)
  • 16.2 Introduction (p. 361)
  • 16.3 Method (p. 364)
  • 16.4 Design (p. 364)
  • 16.5 Procedure (p. 365)
  • 16.6 Results (p. 366)
  • 16.7 Discussion (p. 368)
  • 16.8 References for the Example (p. 371)
  • References (p. 373)
  • Index (p. 379)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andy Field and Graham Hole are both based in the Department of Psychology at the University of Sussex

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