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Research synthesis and meta-analysis : a step-by-step approach / Harris Cooper

Main Author Cooper, Harris M. Country Estados Unidos. Edition 5th ed Publication Los Angeles : Sage, 2017 Description XVIII, 360 p. : il. ; 24 cm Series Applied social research methods series , 2 ISBN 978-1-48333-115-7 CDU 001.8
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 001.8 - C Available 463814
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Fifth Edition of Harris Cooper's bestselling text offers practical advice on how to conduct a synthesis of research in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. The book is written in plain language with four running examples drawn from psychology, education, and health science. With ample coverage of literature searching and the technical aspects of meta-analysis, this one-of-a-kind book applies the basic principles of sound data gathering to the task of producing a comprehensive assessment of existing research. Available with Perusall--an eBook that makes it easier to prepare for class Perusall is an award-winning eBook platform featuring social annotation tools that allow students and instructors to collaboratively mark up and discuss their SAGE textbook. Backed by research and supported by technological innovations developed at Harvard University, this process of learning through collaborative annotation keeps your students engaged and makes teaching easier and more effective. Learn more.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the Fifth Edition (p. xiv)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xvii)
  • About the Author (p. xviii)
  • 1 Introduction: Literature Reviews, Research Syntheses, and Meta-Analyses (p. 1)
  • The Need for Attention to Research Synthesis (p. 2)
  • Goals and Premises of the Book (p. 4)
  • Definitions of Literature Reviews (p. 5)
  • Why We Need Research Syntheses Based on Scientific Principles (p. 9)
  • Principal Outcomes of a Research Synthesis (p. 11)
  • A Brief History of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (p. 12)
  • The Stages of Research Synthesis (p. 15)
  • Step 1 Formulating the Problem (p. 20)
  • Step 2 Searching the Literature (p. 21)
  • Step 3 Gathering Information From Studies (p. 21)
  • Step 4 Evaluating the Quality of Studies (p. 22)
  • Step 5 Analyzing and Integrating the Outcomes of Studies (p. 22)
  • Step 6 Interpreting the Evidence (p. 23)
  • Step 7 Presenting the Results (p. 23)
  • Twenty Questions About Research Syntheses (p. 23)
  • Four Examples of Research Synthesis (p. 26)
  • The Effects of Choice on Intrinsic Motivation (Patall, Cooper, & Robinson, 2008) (p. 26)
  • The Effect of Homework on Academic Achievement (Cooper, Robinson, & Patall, 2006) (p. 27)
  • Individual Differences in Attitudes Toward Rape (Anderson, Cooper, & Okamura, 1997) (p. 28)
  • Aerobic Exercise and Neurocognitive Performance (Smith et al., 2010) (p. 28)
  • 2 Step 1: Formulating the Problem (p. 30)
  • Definition of Variables in Social Science Research (p. 33)
  • Similarities in Concepts and Operations in Primary Research and Research Synthesis (p. 33)
  • Differences in Concepts and Operations in Primary Research and Research Synthesis (p. 34)
  • Multiple Operations in Research Synthesis (p. 36)
  • Multiple Operationism and Concept-to-Operation Correspondence (p. 37)
  • Defining the Relationship of Interest (p. 41)
  • Quantitative or Qualitative Research? (p. 42)
  • Description, Association, or Causal Relationship? (p. 43)
  • Within-Participant or Between-Participant Processes? (p. 46)
  • Simple and Complex Relationships (p. 47)
  • Summary (p. 48)
  • Judging the Conceptual Relevance of Studies (p. 50)
  • Study-Generated and Synthesis-Generated Evidence (p. 54)
  • Summary (p. 56)
  • Arguing for the Value of the Synthesis (p. 56)
  • If a Synthesis Already Exists, Why Is a New One Needed? (p. 58)
  • The Effects of Context on Synthesis Outcomes (p. 59)
  • Notes (p. 60)
  • 3 Step 2: Searching the Literature (p. 61)
  • Population Distinctions in Social Science Research (p. 63)
  • Methods for Locating Studies (p. 64)
  • The Fate of Studies From Initiation to Publication (p. 65)
  • Some Ways Searching Channels Differ (p. 67)
  • Researcher-to-Researcher Channels (p. 68)
  • Personal Contact (p. 70)
  • Mass Solicitations (p. 71)
  • Traditional Invisible Colleges (p. 73)
  • Electronic Invisible Colleges (p. 75)
  • Quality-Controlled Channels (p. 77)
  • Conference Presentations (p. 78)
  • Scholarly Journals (p. 80)
  • Peer Review and Publication Bias (p. 83)
  • Secondary Channels (p. 85)
  • Research Report Reference Lists (p. 87)
  • Research Bibliographies (p. 89)
  • Prospective Research Registers (p. 90)
  • The Internet (p. 90)
  • Reference Databases (p. 93)
  • Conducting Searches of Reference Databases (p. 96)
  • Determining the Adequacy of Literature Searches (p. 100)
  • Problems in Document Retrieval (p. 102)
  • The Effects of Literature Searching on Synthesis Outcomes (p. 103)
  • Notes (p. 109)
  • 4 Step 3: Gathering Information From Studies (p. 110)
  • Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria (p. 111)
  • Developing a Coding Guide (p. 112)
  • Information to Include on a Coding Guide (p. 114)
  • Low- and High-Inference Codes (p. 131)
  • Selecting and Training Coders (p. 133)
  • Transferring Information to the Data File (p. 137)
  • Problems in Gathering Data From Study Reports (p. 137)
  • Imprecise Research Reports (p. 138)
  • Identifying Independent Comparisons (p. 142)
  • Research Teams as Units (p. 144)
  • Studies as Units (p. 144)
  • Samples as Units (p. 145)
  • Comparisons or Estimates as Units (p. 146)
  • Shifting Unit of Analysis (p. 147)
  • Statistical Adjustment (p. 148)
  • The Effects of Data Gathering on Synthesis Outcomes (p. 149)
  • 5 Step 4: Evaluating the Quality of Studies (p. 151)
  • Problems in Judging Research Quality (p. 154)
  • Predispositions of the Judge (p. 154)
  • Judges' Disagreement About What Constitutes Research Quality (p. 157)
  • Differences Among Quality Scales (p. 159)
  • A Priori Exclusion of Research Versus A Posteriori Examination of Research Differences (p. 161)
  • Approaches to Categorizing Research Methods (p. 163)
  • Threats-to-Validity Approach (p. 164)
  • Methods-Description Approach (p. 166)
  • A Mixed-Criteria Approach: The Study DIAD (p. 168)
  • Identifying Statistical Outliers (p. 187)
  • 6 Step 5: Analyzing and Integrating the Outcomes of Studies (p. 189)
  • Data Analysis in Primary Research and Research Synthesis (p. 191)
  • Meta-Analysis (p. 192)
  • Meta-Analysis Comes of Age (p. 194)
  • When Not to Do a Meta-Analysis (p. 194)
  • The Impact of Integrating Techniques on Synthesis Outcomes (p. 198)
  • Main Effects and Interactions in Meta-Analysis (p. 199)
  • Meta-Analysis and the Variation Among Study Results (p. 200)
  • Sources of Variability in Research Findings (p. 200)
  • Vote Counting (p. 204)
  • Combining Significance Levels (p. 208)
  • Measuring Relationship Strength (p. 209)
  • Definition of Effect Size (p. 210)
  • Standardized Mean Difference: The d-index or g-index - (p. 212)
  • Effect Sizes Based on Two Continuous Variables: The x-Index (p. 216)
  • Effect Sizes Based on Two Dichotomous Variables: The Odds and Risk Ratios (p. 219)
  • Practical Issues in Estimating Effect Sizes (p. 220)
  • Coding Effect Sizes (p. 227)
  • Combining Effect Sizes Across Studies (p. 229)
  • The d-Index (p. 230)
  • The r-Index (p. 233)
  • A Note on Combining Slopes From Multiple Regressions (p. 235)
  • The Synthesis Examples (p. 236)
  • Analyzing Variance in Effect Sizes Across Findings (p. 237)
  • Traditional Inferential Statistics (p. 238)
  • Comparing Observed to Expected Variance: Fixed-Effect Models (p. 239)
  • Homogeneity Analyses (p. 240)
  • Comparing Observed and Expected Variance: Random-Effects Models (p. 245)
  • I 2 : The Study-Level Measure of Effect (p. 248)
  • Statistical Power in Meta-Analysis (p. 249)
  • Meta-Regression: Considering Multiple Moderators Simultaneously or Sequentially (p. 251)
  • Using Computer Statistical Packages (p. 253)
  • Some Advanced Techniques in Meta-Analysis (p. 254)
  • Hierarchical Linear Modeling (p. 254)
  • Model-Based Meta-Analysis (p. 254)
  • Bayesian Meta-Analysis (p. 255)
  • Meta-Analysis Using Individual Participant Data (p. 256)
  • Cumulating Results Across Meta-Analyses (p. 257)
  • Notes (p. 259)
  • 7 Step 6: Interpreting the Evidence (p. 261)
  • Missing Data (p. 263)
  • Statistical Sensitivity Analyses (p. 265)
  • Specification and Generalization (p. 267)
  • Integrating Interaction Results Across Studies (p. 268)
  • Study-Generated and Synthesis-Generated Evidence (p. 270)
  • The Substantive Interpretation of Effect Size (p. 271)
  • The Size of the Relationship (p. 271)
  • Using Adjectives to Convey the Practical Significance of Effects (p. 274)
  • Using Adjectives to Convey Proven and Promising Findings (p. 276)
  • Should Researchers Supply Labels at All? (p. 277)
  • Metrics That Are Meaningful to General Audiences (p. 278)
  • Raw and Familiar Transformed Scores (p. 279)
  • Translations of the Standardized Mean Difference (p. 279)
  • Translations of Binomial Effect Size Display (p. 284)
  • Translations of Effects Involving Two Continuous Measures (p. 284)
  • Conclusion (p. 285)
  • Note (p. 285)
  • 8 Step 7: Presenting the Results (p. 286)
  • Report Writing in Social Science Research (p. 287)
  • Meta-Analysis Reporting Standards (MARS) (p. 288)
  • Title (p. 288)
  • Abstract (p. 293)
  • The Introduction Section (p. 293)
  • The Method Section (p. 294)
  • The Results Section (p. 301)
  • The Discussion Section (p. 316)
  • Notes (p. 317)
  • 9 Conclusion: Threats to the Validity of Research Synthesis Conclusions (p. 318)
  • Validity Issues (p. 319)
  • Criticism of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (p. 327)
  • Feasibility and Cost (p. 328)
  • The Scientific Method and Disconfirmation (p. 333)
  • Creativity in Research Synthesis (p. 333)
  • Conclusion (p. 334)
  • References (p. 335)
  • Author Index (p. 347)
  • Subject Index (p. 351)

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