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Knowledge for development? : comparing British, Japanese, Swedish and World Bank aid / Kenneth King and Simon McGrath

Main Author King, Kenneth, 1940- Coauthor McGrath, Simon A. Country Reino Unido. Publication London : HSRC Press, cop. 2004 Description XI, 236 p. ; 22 cm ISBN 1-84277-325-9 CDU 338.1
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 338.1 - K Available 440258
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In 1996, the World Bank President, James Wolfensohn, declared that his organization would henceforth be 'the knowledge bank'. This marked the beginning of a new discourse of knowledge-based aid, which has spread rapidly across the development field. This book is the first detailed attempt to analyse this new discourse.

Through an examination of four agencies -- the World Bank, the British Department for International Development, the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency -- the book explores what this new approach to aid means in both theory and practice. It concludes that too much emphasis has been on developing capacity within agencies rather than addressing the expressed needs of Southern 'partners'. It also questions whether knowledge-based aid leads to greater agency certainty about what constitutes good development.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgements (p. vii)
  • List of abbreviations and acronyms (p. ix)
  • 1 Researching knowledge-based aid (p. 1)
  • Setting the scene (p. 1)
  • Research questions (p. 3)
  • A new way of researching; a new way of working (p. 3)
  • The structure of the book (p. 15)
  • 2 The new aid agenda (p. 18)
  • The changing fashions of development cooperation (p. 18)
  • Aid discourse at the start of the new millennium (p. 25)
  • 3 Knowledge for development (p. 32)
  • The origins of knowledge-based aid (p. 32)
  • Knowledge-based aid (p. 37)
  • Alternative accounts of knowledge and development (p. 49)
  • A concluding comment (p. 52)
  • 4 The World Bank or the knowledge bank? (p. 55)
  • The discovery of knowledge-based aid in the World Bank (p. 55)
  • The World Bank's older knowledge strategies (p. 56)
  • The World Bank's vision of knowledge for development (p. 58)
  • Revising the strategy: the Ramphele review and a shifting focus for the knowledge bank (p. 65)
  • The new architecture of the knowledge bank (p. 70)
  • The knowledge bank in practice: assessing the extent of transformation (p. 90)
  • 5 From information management to knowledge sharing: DFID's unfinished revolution (p. 99)
  • DFID's knowledge discourses (p. 99)
  • DFID's knowledge projects (p. 109)
  • DFID's knowledge products (p. 118)
  • DFID's knowledge practices (p. 121)
  • How should we judge DFID's approach to knowledge and development? (p. 123)
  • 6 Knowledge, learning and capacity in the Swedish approach to development cooperation (p. 130)
  • Historical overview (p. 130)
  • Sida's discourses of knowledge, learning and capacity (p. 133)
  • Sida as a generator of development knowledge (p. 143)
  • Sida's initiatives to support knowledge, learning and capacity development (p. 145)
  • Knowledge and learning in practice (p. 147)
  • Conclusion (p. 152)
  • 7 Experience, experts and knowledge in Japanese aid policy and practice (p. 155)
  • Japan's own experience of development (p. 156)
  • Japan's multiple external sources of development expertise (p. 163)
  • Sources of policy knowledge in Japanese development assistance (p. 170)
  • Knowledge-sharing initiatives in a culture of valuing experience (p. 173)
  • Knowledge management in JICA: a new approach (p. 176)
  • Other mechanisms for sharing development knowledge (p. 186)
  • Conclusion on sharing expertise for development (p. 189)
  • 8 Conclusions and implications for knowledge, aid and development (p. 196)
  • Where does knowledge-based aid come from, and is it just a passing fashion? (p. 196)
  • Does knowledge-based aid work? (p. 197)
  • Knowledge-based aid or learning-led development? (p. 208)
  • Knowledge-based aid and knowledge, aid and development: concluding thoughts (p. 209)
  • Bibliography (p. 213)
  • Index (p. 230)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With advances in information technology, an official focus on partnership, and corporate trends toward "learning organizations," the rhetoric of knowledge has invaded development agencies. King (Univ. of Edinburgh) and McGrath (Human Science Research Council, Pretoria) undertake an ambitious examination of the actual progress of the World Bank and three bilateral aid agencies (British Department for International Development; Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency; Japan International Cooperation Agency) in transforming themselves into knowledge organizations. The focus is almost exclusively on issues of internal organization and agency conceptions of knowledge versus information, providing only suggestive connections with the aid provided. The authors dissect both internal aspects (organizational structure, IT systems, policy evolution) and external aspects (interactions with recipients, Web sites). Their comparison of these agencies is a monumental task and certain to find an appreciative audience among scholars interested in organizational learning and aid agencies. The broader appeal is less obvious as the presentation is simultaneously abstract in terms of concepts and numbingly detailed in terms of organizational issues. Consequently, the book lacks the type of case study that might have wider appeal and skirts major issues such as the role of lending in a knowledge aid agency. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Specialized research and professional collections. C. Kilby Vassar College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kenneth King is Professor of International and Comparative Education and Director of the Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh. He is the author or editor of several books , including 'Aid and Education' and 'Changing International Aid to Education' (edited with Lene Buchert).
Simon McGrath has been a research fellow at the Centre of African Studies, and became Research Director at the Human Sciences Research Council in Pretoria, South Africa in October 2002.
Both authors have published extensively in African Studies and International Comparative Education and have been researching development cooperation for a number of years.
Kenneth King is Professor of International and Comparative Education and Director of the Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh. He is the author or editor of several books , including 'Aid and Education' and 'Changing International Aid to Education' (edited with Lene Buchert).
Simon McGrath has been a research fellow at the Centre of African Studies, and became Research Director at the Human Sciences Research Council in Pretoria, South Africa in October 2002.
Both authors have published extensively in African Studies and International Comparative Education and have been researching development cooperation for a number of years.

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