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Human factors methods for design : making systems human-centered / Christopher P. Nemeth

Main Author Nemeth, Christopher P. Country Estados Unidos. Publication Boca Raton : CRC Press, cop. 2004 Description XXIII, 392 p. : il. ; 26 cm ISBN 0-415-29798-2 CDU 74:65.015.11 65.015.11:74
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca da UMinho no Campus de Azurém
BPG2 74:65.015.11 - N Available 431516

Licenciatura em Design de Produto Ergonomia no Design 2º semestre

Monografia Biblioteca do Campus de Couros
BCC 74:65.015.11 - N Available 440628
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

There is no shortage of available human factors information, but until now there was no single guide on how to use this information. Human Factors Methods for Design: Making Systems Human-Centered is an in-depth field guide to solving human factors challenges in the development process. It provides design and human factors professionals, systems engineers, and research and development managers with the orientation, process, and methods to perform human-centered research.

The book delivers an overview of human factors and the application of research to product and service development. It enables the reader to define a design opportunity, develop product goals, and establish criteria to meet those goals. The text offers a road map for collecting and analyzing human performance information, applying that information to the creation of solutions, and using the information to evaluate potential solutions.

The book demonstrates, in three sections, a way to design products that extend, amplify, and enhance human capabilities. Human Factors Practice explains research context including the operational environment and internal and external influences. Human Factors Methods explains how to perform a wide variety of procedures for human-oriented research and development. Application demonstrates how to put the results to use .

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of illustrations (p. ix)
  • Foreword (p. xii)
  • Preface (p. xiii)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xix)
  • Abbreviations (p. xxi)
  • Part I Human factors practice (p. 1)
  • 1 The human-made environment (p. 3)
  • 1.1 The systems model (p. 4)
  • 1.2 Requirements (p. 10)
  • 1.3 Life cycle (p. 15)
  • 1.4 The development process (p. 16)
  • 1.5 System issues (p. 23)
  • 1.6 Human factors practice (p. 25)
  • 1.7 Summary (p. 32)
  • 2 Human abilities and limits (p. 33)
  • 2.1 Human roles (p. 34)
  • 2.2 Input (p. 36)
  • 2.3 Mediation (p. 40)
  • 2.4 Output (p. 47)
  • 2.5 Response to environment (p. 51)
  • 2.6 Motivation (p. 57)
  • 2.7 Adaptation (p. 58)
  • 2.8 Human erroneous actions, or error (p. 59)
  • 2.9 Group versus individual (p. 64)
  • 2.10 Summary (p. 65)
  • 3 How we think about development problems (p. 67)
  • 3.1 Reasoning (p. 68)
  • 3.2 Philosophical thought (p. 69)
  • 3.3 Intelligence (p. 71)
  • 3.4 Problem solving behavior (p. 72)
  • 3.5 Impediments to problem solving (p. 75)
  • 3.6 Summary (p. 78)
  • 4 What influences development? (p. 80)
  • 4.1 Problems and opportunities (p. 80)
  • 4.2 Influences on research and development (p. 84)
  • 4.3 Process (p. 88)
  • 4.4 Rapid prototyping (p. 94)
  • 4.5 Personal conduct (p. 96)
  • 4.6 Summary (p. 98)
  • 5 Human factors in research and development (p. 99)
  • 5.1 Applied human factors research (p. 100)
  • 5.2 Observation (p. 104)
  • 5.3 Inferential studies (p. 111)
  • 5.4 How to choose methods (p. 118)
  • 5.5 Summary (p. 123)
  • Part II Human factors methods (p. 125)
  • 6 Analysis methods (p. 127)
  • 6.1 Pareto analysis (p. 128)
  • 6.2 Operational analysis ('mission analysis') (p. 131)
  • 6.3 Analysis of similar systems (p. 135)
  • 6.4 Activity analysis (p. 137)
  • 6.5 Verbal protocol analysis ('thinking aloud', 'directed dialog') (p. 142)
  • 6.6 Critical incident study (p. 145)
  • 6.7 Management oversight and risk tree analysis (MORT) (p. 149)
  • 6.8 Error analysis (p. 152)
  • 6.9 Root cause analysis (p. 156)
  • 6.10 Summary (p. 160)
  • 7 Design guidance methods (p. 161)
  • 7.1 Flow analysis (p. 164)
  • 7.2 Time line analysis (p. 172)
  • 7.3 Link analysis (p. 175)
  • 7.4 Function allocation (p. 180)
  • 7.5 Task description ('task identification') (p. 187)
  • 7.6 Task analysis (p. 190)
  • 7.7 Cognitive task analysis (p. 195)
  • 7.8 Technique for human error rate prediction (THERP) (p. 202)
  • 7.9 Work design (p. 208)
  • 7.10 Decision analysis (p. 212)
  • 7.11 Summary (p. 216)
  • 8 Evaluation methods (p. 218)
  • 8.1 Simulation (p. 219)
  • 8.2 Fault tree analysis (p. 224)
  • 8.3 Failure modes and effects analysis (p. 229)
  • 8.4 Operational sequence analysis (p. 233)
  • 8.5 Workload assessment (p. 237)
  • 8.6 Summary (p. 245)
  • 9 Surveys: interviews and questionnaires (p. 247)
  • 9.1 Questionnaires (p. 248)
  • 9.2 Interviews (p. 252)
  • 9.3 Self-administered questionnaires (p. 260)
  • 9.4 Bias, presumption and non-response (p. 261)
  • 9.5 Summary (p. 262)
  • 10 Usability assessment (p. 264)
  • 10.1 Usability (p. 264)
  • 10.2 Usability assessment methods (p. 265)
  • 10.3 Usability testing (p. 268)
  • 10.4 Usability benefits and issues (p. 281)
  • 10.5 Summary (p. 282)
  • 11 Controlled studies (p. 284)
  • 11.1 Basic controlled studies (p. 285)
  • 11.2 Process (p. 296)
  • 11.3 Experimental design (p. 298)
  • 11.4 Inferential study (p. 306)
  • 11.5 Summary (p. 316)
  • Part III Application (p. 319)
  • 12 Cost-effectiveness (p. 321)
  • 12.1 Value (p. 321)
  • 12.2 Cost-benefit analysis (p. 323)
  • 12.3 Cost-effectiveness (p. 324)
  • 12.4 Determining cost-effectiveness (p. 327)
  • 12.5 Application to practice (p. 329)
  • 12.6 Summary (p. 331)
  • 13 Effecting change (p. 332)
  • 13.1 Research and development is change (p. 332)
  • 13.2 Working relationships (p. 333)
  • 13.3 Traits for change (p. 334)
  • 13.4 Change management (p. 336)
  • 13.5 Change evolution (p. 337)
  • 13.6 The change process (p. 339)
  • 13.7 Example (p. 340)
  • 13.8 Summary (p. 343)
  • 14 Communication (p. 344)
  • 14.1 Purpose (p. 345)
  • 14.2 Nature of research and development communications (p. 345)
  • 14.3 Types of human factors communications (p. 348)
  • 14.4 Summary (p. 352)
  • 15 Examples (p. 353)
  • 15.1 Bus workstation (p. 353)
  • 15.2 International currency exchange (p. 358)
  • 15.3 Web site design (p. 361)
  • 15.4 Remote site collaborative communications tool (p. 362)
  • 15.5 Sharps disposal container (p. 364)
  • 15.6 Infusion pump (p. 367)
  • 15.7 Reference laboratory assay system (p. 370)
  • Notes (p. 373)
  • Appendix (p. 374)
  • Bibliography (p. 379)
  • Index (p. 388)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher P. Nemeth, M.S. Design, CHFP, manages his own design, human factors and expert witness consulting practice

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