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Schooling in capitalist America : educational reform and the contradictions of economic life / Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis

Main Author Bowles, Samuel Coauthor Gintis, Herbert, 1940- Country Estados Unidos. Publication Chicago : Haymarket Books, 2011 Description XIII, 340 p. : il. ; 23 cm ISBN 978-1-60846-131-8 CDU 37.014
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 37.014 - B Available 421079
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"This seminal work . . . establishes a persuasive new paradigm."-- Contemporary Sociology

No book since Schooling in Capitalist America has taken on the systemic forces hard at work undermining our education system. This classic reprint is an invaluable resource for radical educators.

Samuel Bowles is research professor and director of the behavioral sciences program at the Santa Fe Institute, and professor emeritus of economics at the University of Massachusetts.

Herbert Gintis is an external professor at the Santa Fe Institute and emeritus professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the 2011 Edition: Schooling in Capitalist America Revisited (p. ix)
  • Preface (p. xiii)
  • Part I The Contradictions of Liberal Education Reform
  • 1 Beyond the Educational Frontier: The Great American Dream Freeze (p. 3)
  • 2 Broken Promises: School Reform in Retrospect (p. 18)
  • Part II Education and the Structure of Economic Life
  • 3 At the Root of the Problem: The Capitalist Economy (p. 53)
  • 4 Education, Inequality, and the Meritocracy (p. 102)
  • 5 Education and Personal Development: The Long Shadow of Work (p. 125)
  • Part III The Dynamics of Educational Change
  • 6 The Origins of Mass Public Education (p. 151)
  • 7 Corporate Capital and Progressive Education (p. 180)
  • 8 The Transformation of Higher Education and the Emerging White-Collar Proletariat (p. 201)
  • 9 Capital Accumulation, Class Conflict, and Educational Change (p. 224)
  • Part IV Getting There (p. 245)
  • 10 Educational Alternatives (p. 264)
  • 11 Education, Socialism, and Revolution (p. 289)
  • Appendices (p. 289)
  • Notes (p. 304)
  • Index (p. 333)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Kirkus Book Review

This Ford Foundation-sponsored study surveys the retreat of liberal reforms in American public education and offers a wide-ranging critique of that system, based on the principle that education cannot be viewed separately from class structure and economic institutions. Not ""technological necessity or educators' bungling"" but the hierarchical character of capitalist relationships explains the failure to meet the promise of equality and self-development. The authors examine genetic theorists, ""free school"" initiatives, and other proposals for replacing liberal commitments; they include an extensive sampling of empirical studies, along with a survey of the history of U.S. education, which, they conclude, represents a trade-off between workers' demands for cultural and occupational elevation on the one hand, and employers' attempts to secure social control through mass institutions. For all their factual investigations, Bowles and Gintis retain a relatively timeless and abstract view of ""corporate capitalism,"" whose flaws are ""hierarchy, waste and alienation."" Despite their admiration for John Dewey, they see a permanent ""basic contradiction between the reproductive needs of the community and the self-actualizing needs of students."" And, having argued that no educational reform can be projected without a parallel revolutionary program for changing economic relations, they end with the regret that ""the long march through the institutions"" must go on for many years. Still, this is a provocative effort by two members of the Union of Radical Political Economists. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Samuel Bowles is research professor and director of the behavioral sciences program at the Santa Fe Institute and emeritus professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts. Herbert Gintis is an external professor at Ihe Santa Fe institute and emeritus professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts.

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