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What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy / James Paul Gee

Main Author Gee, James Paul Country Estados Unidos. Edition Rev. and updated ed Publication New York : Palgrave Macmillan, cop. 2007 Description 249 p. ; 24 cm ISBN 1-4039-8453-0
978-1-4039-8453-1
CDU 371.333
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 371.333 - G Available 415638
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

James Paul Gee begins his classic book with "I want to talk about video games--yes, even violent video games--and say some positive things about them." With this simple but explosive statement, one of America's most well-respected educators looks seriously at the good that can come from playing video games. In this revised edition, new games like World of WarCraft and Half Life 2 are evaluated and theories of cognitive development are expanded. Gee looks at major cognitive activities including how individuals develop a sense of identity, how we grasp meaning, how we evaluate and follow a command, pick a role model, and perceive the world.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction: 36 Ways to Learn a Video Game Semiotic Domains
  • Is Playing Video Games a 'Waste of Time'?
  • Learning and Identity: What Does It Mean to Be a Half-Elf?
  • Situated Meaning and Learning: What Should You Do after You Have Destroyed the Global Conspiracy?
  • Telling and Doing: Why Doesn't Lara Croft Obey Prof. Von Croy?
  • Cultural Models: Do You Want to be the Blue Sonic or the Dark Sonic?
  • The Social Mind: How Do You Get Your Corpse Back after You've Died?
  • Conclusion: Duped or Not?
  • Appendix: The 36 Learning Principles

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Paul Gee has been featured in a variety of publications from Redbook, Child, Teacher , and USA Today to Education Week, The Chicago Tribune , and more. He is Professor of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Described by the Chronicle of Higher Education as "a serious scholar who is taking a lead in an emerging field" he has become a major expert in game studies today.

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