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Cases and materials on EU law / Stephen Weatherill

Main Author Weatherill, Stephen, 1961- Country Reino Unido. Edition 8th ed Publication Oxford : Oxford University Press, cop. 2007 Description LII, 708 p. ; 25 cm ISBN 978-0-19-921401-3 CDU 341.217:061.1CE 061.1CE:341.217
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 341.217: 061.1UE - W Available 375145

Mestrado em Direito dos Negócios, Europeu e Transnacional Direito da União Europeia 1º semestre

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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Cases and Materials on EU Law is widely recognized as the most authoritative and successful book of its kind on the market. Written by one of the UK's leading European lawyers, it provides a complete and essential resource for all students of EU law.A comprehensive selection of important cases and legislation is supported by Weatherill's lively commentary and pertinent questions, which explain the materials and stimulate further discussion in an easy-to-read format. This popular text helps students to understand the development of the EuropeanUnion and its policies, covering the major judgments delivered by the European Court over the past forty years, and considering the effects the latest proposals and regulations will have.Online Resource CentreFor lecturers:Guidance on using the book when teachingFor students:UpdatesWeb linksInteractive mapAnimated timeline

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. xii)
  • Acknowledgments (p. xiv)
  • Table of Cases (p. xvi)
  • Table of Legislation (p. xxx)
  • Amsterdam Treaty Table of Equivalence (p. xxxiv)
  • Note on the Citation of Articles of the Treaties in Court Publications (p. xliv)
  • Abbreviations (p. xlvi)
  • Part I The Constitutional Law of the EU (p. 1)
  • 1 The Evolution of the European Union (p. 3)
  • Section 1 Introduction (p. 3)
  • 2 The Sources of the Law (p. 27)
  • Section 1 The Treaties (p. 28)
  • Section 2 Legislation (p. 30)
  • A Legislation in the European Union (p. 30)
  • B The legislative process (p. 34)
  • C The principle of attributed competence (p. 43)
  • D Reasoning (p. 56)
  • Section 3 General Principles of Community Law (p. 58)
  • A Proportionality (p. 59)
  • B Fundamental rights (p. 66)
  • C Technique (p. 78)
  • 3 The Nature of Community Law: Supremacy (p. 89)
  • Section 1 Supremacy (p. 89)
  • Section 2 Direct Applicability (p. 93)
  • Section 3 Pre-emption (p. 94)
  • 4 The Enforcement of Community Law: 'Dual Vigilance' (p. 99)
  • Section 1 Dual Vigilance (p. 99)
  • Section 2 Control at Community Level (p. 101)
  • A The nature of Article 226 (p. 101)
  • B The effectiveness of Article 226 (p. 104)
  • C Complaining to the Commission (p. 111)
  • Section 3 Control at National Level (p. 113)
  • A The criteria governing direct effect (p. 113)
  • B Direct effect as a policy choice (p. 119)
  • C Procedure and remedies (p. 122)
  • 5 The Direct Effect of Directives (p. 133)
  • Section 1 Establishing the Principle (p. 133)
  • Section 2 Curtailing the Principle (p. 136)
  • Section 3 The Scope of the Principle: the State (p. 142)
  • Section 4 'Incidental Effect' (p. 145)
  • Section 5 The Principle of Indirect Effect, or the Obligation of 'Conform-interpretation' (p. 152)
  • 6 State Liability (p. 161)
  • 7 Article 234: The Preliminary Reference Procedure (p. 183)
  • Section 1 The Purpose of Article 234 (p. 183)
  • Section 2 The Separation of Functions (p. 185)
  • Section 3 The Effect of an Article 234 Ruling (p. 195)
  • Section 4 Bodies Competent to Refer (p. 196)
  • Section 5 The Obligation to Refer and the Doctrine of Acte Clair (p. 199)
  • Section 6 The Power to Refer (p. 203)
  • Section 7 The Court's Information Note on References (p. 206)
  • Section 8 Reforming the Court System (p. 208)
  • 8 Control of Community Institutions (p. 213)
  • Section 1 Introduction (p. 213)
  • Section 2 Article 230 (p. 215)
  • A Article 230, first to third paragraphs (p. 216)
  • B Article 230, non-privileged applicants (p. 217)
  • C Individual concern (p. 218)
  • D Direct concern (p. 222)
  • E The example of the anti-dumping cases (p. 224)
  • F Grounds for annulment (p. 229)
  • G Interim measures (p. 230)
  • Section 3 Article 232 (p. 231)
  • Section 4 Article 241 (p. 234)
  • Section 5 Articles 235 and 288 (p. 236)
  • Section 6 Article 234 (p. 244)
  • A The function of Article 234 in judicial review (p. 244)
  • B The limitations of Article 234 in judicial review (p. 247)
  • C Article 234 and the validity of Community acts (p. 250)
  • D The effect of an Article 234 ruling (p. 257)
  • Section 7 The Interrelation of the Several Remedies and Pressure for Liberalization of the Standing Rules (p. 258)
  • A Pressure for liberalization, 1994-2001 (p. 259)
  • B Pressure for liberalization, 2002 and beyond (p. 264)
  • Epilogue to Part One: Constitutionalism (p. 273)
  • Part II Community Trade Law and Policy (p. 285)
  • 9 Law and the Economic Objectives of the Community (p. 287)
  • Section 1 Introduction (p. 287)
  • Section 2 The Common Market (p. 288)
  • Section 3 The Internal Market: 1992 (p. 293)
  • A The background (p. 293)
  • B The internal market defined (p. 297)
  • C The anticipated benefits of the completion of the internal market (p. 298)
  • Section 4 Measuring the Impact of '1992' (p. 301)
  • A Measurement in 1996 (p. 301)
  • B Measurement in 2002 (p. 303)
  • C The business response (p. 305)
  • Section 5 Managing the Internal Market (p. 307)
  • Section 6 Economic and Monetary Union (p. 317)
  • 10 Fiscal Barriers to Trade: Articles 25 and 90 (p. 323)
  • Section 1 Article 25 (p. 324)
  • Section 2 Article 90 (p. 328)
  • Section 3 Fiscal Harmonization (p. 334)
  • 11 Physical and Technical Barriers to Trade: Articles 28-30 (p. 337)
  • Section 1 The Development of Article 28 (p. 337)
  • Section 2 The Application of Article 28 (p. 342)
  • Section 3 Article 30 (p. 364)
  • A Public morality (p. 364)
  • B The protection of health and life of humans, animals, and plants (p. 369)
  • Section 4 Eliminating Remaining Barriers to Trade (p. 376)
  • 12 Beyond Discrimination: Article 28 (p. 379)
  • Section 1 Indistinctly Applicable Rules: the Cassis de Dijon Formula (p. 379)
  • Section 2 Locating the Outer Limit of Article 28 (p. 391)
  • Section 3 Justifying Indistinctly Applicable Rules (p. 405)
  • Section 4 What Sort of Market is Being Made? Some Consequences for Consumer Protection (p. 414)
  • 13 The Free Movement of Workers: Article 39 (p. 425)
  • Section 1 Who is a Worker? (p. 426)
  • Section 2 To What Advantages is the Worker Entitled? (p. 430)
  • Section 3 Exceptions (p. 436)
  • 14 Freedom of Establishment and the Free Movement of Services: Articles 43 and 49 (p. 445)
  • Section 1 The Rights (p. 445)
  • Section 2 Non-discrimination (p. 446)
  • Section 3 Beyond Discrimination (p. 449)
  • A Challenging and justifying obstructive national measures (p. 450)
  • B Cases dealing with company law (p. 460)
  • C Cases dealing with particularly sensitive State choices (p. 466)
  • Section 4 Harmonization (p. 474)
  • 15 European Citizenship Within an Area of Freedom, Security, and Justice (p. 477)
  • Section 1 Introduction (p. 477)
  • Section 2 Free Movement of Persons Within an Area of Freedom, Security, and Justice (p. 480)
  • Section 3 European Citizenship (p. 486)
  • Epilogue to Part Two (p. 497)
  • Part III Competition Law (p. 501)
  • 16 Article 81: Cartels (p. 503)
  • Section 1 Introduction to Competition Law (p. 503)
  • Section 2 Article 81 (p. 504)
  • Section 3 Jurisdiction (p. 508)
  • Section 4 An Agreement (p. 511)
  • Section 5 The Concerted Practice (p. 513)
  • Section 6 Restriction of Competition (p. 518)
  • A Preventing or distorting competition (p. 518)
  • B Agreements of minor importance (p. 523)
  • C Assessing a 'restriction of competition' in its full context (p. 530)
  • D State involvement (p. 535)
  • Section 7 Exemption (p. 540)
  • Section 8 Block Exemption (p. 541)
  • 17 Article 82: Dominant Positions (p. 549)
  • Section 1 The Dominant Position: Defining the Market (p. 550)
  • Section 2 Abuse (p. 568)
  • 18 The Enforcement of the Competition Rules (p. 579)
  • Epilogue to Part Three (p. 613)
  • Part IV Policy-Making, Governance, and the Constitutional Debate (p. 615)
  • 19 Harmonization and Common Policy-Making (p. 617)
  • Section 1 Introduction (p. 617)
  • Section 2 Harmonization Policy (p. 620)
  • A Harmonization as an introduction to the wider debate (p. 620)
  • B The New Approach to harmonization policy (p. 623)
  • C Questioning the New Approach (p. 628)
  • Section 3 Methods of Harmonization (p. 632)
  • A Harmonization and the allocation of competence between the EC and the Member States (p. 632)
  • B The management of Article 95(4) et seq (p. 633)
  • C Harmonization, competence, and the scope for minimum rules (p. 637)
  • Section 4 The Example of Consumer Law (p. 642)
  • A Minimum harmonization (p. 643)
  • B The Product Liability Directive (p. 644)
  • C Uniform application of Community consumer law (p. 649)
  • D The Product Liability Directive and pre-emption (p. 653)
  • 20 Subsidiarity, Flexibility, and New Forms of Governance (p. 659)
  • Section 1 Subsidiarity (p. 660)
  • Section 2 Variable Integration and Flexibility (p. 670)
  • Section 3 Instruments of Governance (p. 681)
  • 21 What Sort of 'Europe'? (p. 691)
  • Section 1 The Challenge of National Constitutional Courts (p. 691)
  • Section 2 States and Beyond: Multi-level Governance and Constitutionalism (p. 703)
  • Section 3 Legitimacy and Democracy (p. 710)
  • Epilogue to Part Four: Europe's True Soul (p. 719)
  • Final Questions (p. 723)
  • Selected Bibliography (p. 725)
  • Index (p. 727)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Stephen Weatherill is the Jacques Delors Professor of European Community Law, Associate Director of the Centre for the Advanced Study of European and Comparative Law at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Somerville College. His research interests embrace the field of European Law in itswidest sense, although his published work is predominantly concerned with European Community trade law.

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