Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Biodegradable polymers for industrial applications / ed. Ray Smith

Secondary Author Smith, Ray Country Estados Unidos. Publication Boca Raton : CRC Press, cop. 2005 Description XVI, 531 p. ; 24 cm ISBN 0-8493-3466-7 CDU 678.06
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca da UMinho no Campus de Azurém
BPG 678.06 - B Available 360081

Mestrado Integrado em Engenharia de Polímeros Polímeros Naturais e Biodegradáveis 2º semestre

Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The vast majority of plastic products are made from petroleum-based synthetic polymers that do not degrade in a landfill or in a compost-like environment. Therefore, the disposal of these products poses a serious environmental problem. An environmentally-conscious alternative is to design/synthesize polymers that are biodegradable.

Biodegradable polymers for industrial applications introduces the subject in part one by outlining the classification and development of biodegradable polymers with individual chapters on polyhydroxyalkanoates, polyesteramides and thermoplastic starch biodegradable polymers and others. The second part explores the materials available for the production of biodegradable polymers. Polymers derived from sugars, natural fibres, renewable forest resources, poly(lactic acid) and protein-nanoparticle composites will be looked at in detail in this section. Part three looks at the properties and mechanisms of degradation, prefacing the subject with a chapter on current standards. The final part explores opportunities for industrial applications, with chapters on packing, agriculture and biodegradable polycaprolactone foams in supercritical carbon dioxide.

Biodegradable polymers for industrial applications explores the fundamental concepts concerning the development of biodegradable polymers, degradable polymers from sustainable sources, degradation and properties and industrial applications. It is an authoritative book that will be invaluable for academics, researchers and policy makers in the industry.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Contributor contact details (p. xiii)
  • Part I Classification and development
  • 1 Classification of biodegradable polymers (p. 3)
  • 1.1 Introduction (p. 3)
  • 1.2 Biopolymers from natural origins (p. 4)
  • 1.3 Biopolymers from mineral origins (p. 21)
  • 1.4 Conclusions (p. 29)
  • 1.5 References (p. 29)
  • 2 Polyhydroxyalkanoates (p. 32)
  • 2.1 Introduction (p. 32)
  • 2.2 Mechanical and thermal properties of PHA (p. 37)
  • 2.3 Process development and scale up for microbial PHA production (p. 42)
  • 2.4 Applications of PHA (p. 48)
  • 2.5 Future developments (p. 50)
  • 2.6 References (p. 50)
  • 3 Oxo-biodegradable polyolefins (p. 57)
  • 3.1 Introduction (p. 57)
  • 3.2 Polyolefin peroxidation (p. 58)
  • 3.3 Control of polyolefin lifetimes (p. 62)
  • 3.4 Oxidative degradation after use (p. 63)
  • 3.5 Aerobic biodegradation (p. 66)
  • 3.6 Applications of oxo-biodegradable polyolefins (p. 66)
  • 3.7 Environmental impact (p. 69)
  • 3.8 Future developments (p. 73)
  • 3.9 References (p. 74)
  • 4 New developments in the synthesis of aliphatic polyesters by ring-opening polymerisation (p. 77)
  • 4.1 Introduction (p. 77)
  • 4.2 Synthesis of aliphatic polyesters by ring-opening polymerisation (p. 77)
  • 4.3 Reactive extrusion (p. 87)
  • 4.4 Supercritical carbon dioxide as a medium for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactones and lactides and a processing aid for aliphatic polyesters (p. 91)
  • 4.5 Future developments (p. 101)
  • 4.6 Acknowledgements (p. 102)
  • 4.7 Bibliography (p. 102)
  • 5 Biodegradable polyesteramides (p. 107)
  • 5.1 Introduction (p. 107)
  • 5.2 Poly(ester amide)s synthesis (p. 107)
  • 5.3 Polydepsipeptides (p. 124)
  • 5.4 Concluding comments (p. 132)
  • 5.5 Further information (p. 132)
  • 5.6 References (p. 132)
  • 6 Thermoplastic starch biodegradable polymers (p. 140)
  • 6.1 Introduction (p. 140)
  • 6.2 Properties of starch (p. 141)
  • 6.3 Thermoplastic starch and their blends (p. 149)
  • 6.4 Modified thermoplastic starch polymers (p. 153)
  • 6.5 Commercial applications and products for thermoplastic starch polymers (p. 155)
  • 6.6 Thermoplastic starch polymers - looking beyond traditional polymer applications (p. 156)
  • 6.7 Future developments (p. 157)
  • 6.8 Further information (p. 158)
  • 6.9 Acknowledgements (p. 159)
  • 6.10 References (p. 159)
  • Part II Materials for production of biodegradable polymers
  • 7 Biodegradable polymers from sugars (p. 165)
  • 7.1 Introduction (p. 165)
  • 7.2 Biodegradable polymers obtained from monosaccharides and disaccharides (p. 166)
  • 7.3 Biodegradable polymers obtained from synthetic polysaccharides (p. 173)
  • 7.4 Biodegradable polymers obtained from natural polysaccharides (p. 178)
  • 7.5 Future developments - 'biodegradable' polymers obtained from hemicelluloses (p. 180)
  • 7.6 References (p. 184)
  • 8 Biodegradable polymer composites from natural fibres (p. 189)
  • 8.1 Introduction (p. 189)
  • 8.2 Natural fibres as polymer reinforcement (p. 190)
  • 8.3 Natural fibre-polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) composites (p. 191)
  • 8.4 Natural fibre-polylactide (PLA) composites (p. 198)
  • 8.5 Natural fibre-starch composites (p. 203)
  • 8.6 Natural fibre-soy resin composites (p. 208)
  • 8.7 Natural fibres in combination with synthetic biodegradable polymers (p. 210)
  • 8.8 Commercial developments (p. 211)
  • 8.9 Conclusion (p. 213)
  • 8.10 Further information (p. 213)
  • 8.11 References (p. 214)
  • 9 Biodegradable polymers from renewable forest resources (p. 219)
  • 9.1 Lignocellulosic biomass as a renewable and value-added feedstock for biodegradable polymer production (p. 219)
  • 9.2 Cellulose: as a platform substrate for degradable polymer synthesis (p. 223)
  • 9.3 Hemicellulose and its application as a feedstock for biodegradable polymers (p. 226)
  • 9.4 Sources of further information (p. 244)
  • 9.5 Conclusions and future developments (p. 246)
  • 9.6 References (p. 246)
  • 10 Poly(lactic acid)-based bioplastics (p. 251)
  • 10.1 Introduction (p. 251)
  • 10.2 Properties of PLA (p. 252)
  • 10.3 Blends of PLA (p. 261)
  • 10.4 Plasticization of PLA-based bioplastics (p. 270)
  • 10.5 Aging and biodegradation (p. 275)
  • 10.6 Applications of PLA based bioplastics (p. 280)
  • 10.7 References (p. 281)
  • 11 Biodegradable protein-nanoparticle composites (p. 289)
  • 11.1 Introduction (p. 289)
  • 11.2 Delaminating clay using ultrasonics (p. 293)
  • 11.3 Processing protein-nanoparticle composites using extrusion (p. 298)
  • 11.4 Microstructure and mechanical properties of protein-nanoparticle composites (p. 298)
  • 11.5 Conclusion (p. 306)
  • 11.6 References (p. 307)
  • Part III Properties and mechanisms of degradation
  • 12 Standards for environmentally biodegradable plastics (p. 313)
  • 12.1 Why standards are necessary (p. 313)
  • 12.2 Bio-based polymers (p. 316)
  • 12.3 The post-use treatment of plastics for the recovery of value (p. 317)
  • 12.4 Mechanisms of polymer biodegradation (p. 319)
  • 12.5 Laboratory studies (p. 322)
  • 12.6 The development of national and international standards for biodegradable plastics (p. 323)
  • 12.7 Lessons from the past and future developments (p. 329)
  • 12.8 Acknowledgements (p. 331)
  • 12.9 References (p. 332)
  • 13 Material properties of biodegradable polymers (p. 336)
  • 13.1 Introduction (p. 336)
  • 13.2 Biodegradation (p. 337)
  • 13.3 Natural polymers (p. 340)
  • 13.4 Microbial polyesters (p. 341)
  • 13.5 Synthetic polyesters (p. 343)
  • 13.6 Poly-lactic acid (p. 343)
  • 13.7 Poly(glycolic) acid (p. 345)
  • 13.8 Polycaprolactone (p. 345)
  • 13.9 Poly(alkene succinate) (p. 345)
  • 13.10 Aliphatic-aromatic copolyesters (p. 346)
  • 13.11 Poly(orthoesters) (p. 346)
  • 13.12 Polyanhydrides (p. 347)
  • 13.13 Polycarbonates/polyiminocarbonates (p. 347)
  • 13.14 Blends (p. 347)
  • 13.15 Water-soluble polymers (p. 348)
  • 13.16 Future developments (p. 349)
  • 13.17 Acknowledgements (p. 352)
  • 13.18 References (p. 352)
  • 14 Mechanism of biodegradation (p. 357)
  • 14.1 Introduction (p. 357)
  • 14.2 Biodegradation mechanism: overview (p. 359)
  • 14.3 Biodegradation mechanism of naturally occurring polymers (p. 362)
  • 14.4 Biodegradation mechanism of polyesters (p. 365)
  • 14.5 Biodegradation mechanism of polycarbonates and polyethers (p. 372)
  • 14.6 Biodegradation mechanism of poly(vinyl alcohol) (p. 376)
  • 14.7 Biodegradation mechanism of polyurethanes (p. 382)
  • 14.8 Biodegradation mechanism of poly(amino acid) (p. 384)
  • 14.9 Biodegradation mechanism of miscellaneous polymers (p. 389)
  • 14.10 Future trends (p. 393)
  • 14.11 Bibliography (p. 394)
  • 14.12 References (p. 395)
  • 15 Enzymatic degradation of polymers (p. 411)
  • 15.1 Introduction (p. 411)
  • 15.2 Vinyl polymers (p. 414)
  • 15.3 Hydrolyzable polymers (p. 419)
  • 15.4 Natural biodegradable polymers (p. 423)
  • 15.5 Conclusion (p. 427)
  • 15.6 References (p. 428)
  • Part IV Industrial applications
  • 16 Oxo-biodegradable polyolefins in packaging (p. 437)
  • 16.1 Introduction (p. 437)
  • 16.2 Characteristics of packaging plastics (p. 439)
  • 16.3 Oxo-biodegradable polyolefins (p. 440)
  • 16.4 Disposal (p. 444)
  • 16.5 Recovery (p. 447)
  • 16.6 Environmental impact (p. 448)
  • 16.7 References (p. 449)
  • 17 Biodegradable plastics in agriculture (p. 451)
  • 17.1 Plasticulture (p. 451)
  • 17.2 Oxo-biodegradation of polyolefins in the environment (p. 464)
  • 17.3 The impact of degradable plastics on the environment (p. 466)
  • 17.4 Future developments (p. 470)
  • 17.5 Acknowledgements (p. 471)
  • 17.6 References (p. 471)
  • 18 Generation of biodegradable polycaprolactone foams in supercritical carbon dioxide (p. 474)
  • 18.1 Introduction (p. 474)
  • 18.2 Generation of polycaprolactone foams (p. 477)
  • 18.3 Effect of processing conditions on the foaming cell (p. 480)
  • 18.4 Crystallinity of foamed polycaprolactone (p. 488)
  • 18.5 Conclusion (p. 490)
  • 18.6 References (p. 491)
  • 19 Biodegradable polymers in agricultural applications (p. 494)
  • 19.1 Introduction (p. 494)
  • 19.2 Materials applied in agriculture (p. 495)
  • 19.3 Evaluating properties of biodegradable materials in agriculture (p. 501)
  • 19.4 Market issues (p. 510)
  • 19.5 Conclusion (p. 513)
  • 19.6 Further information (p. 514)
  • 19.7 References (p. 515)
  • Index (p. 517)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.