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Database systems : a practical approach to design, implementation, and management / Thomas M. Connolly, Carolyn E. Begg

Main Author Connolly, Thomas M. Coauthor Begg, Carolyn E. Country Estados Unidos. Edition 4th ed Publication Harlow : Addison-Wesley, 2005 Description XLIX, 1374 p. : il. ; 24 cm Series International computer science series ISBN 0-321-21025-5 CDU 681.3
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 681.3 - C Checked out 2022-01-27 352925

Mestrado Integrado em Engenharia Informática Bases de Dados 1º semestre

Mestrado em Economia Sistemas de Informação Analíticos 1º semestre

Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Presenting the developments in database technology, this edition offers an introduction to design, implementation and management issues, and a treatment of database languages and standards. Meant for students and professionals, it includes explanations using case studies. The design methodology is divided into conceptual, logical, and physical.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. xxxiii)
  • Part 1 Background (p. 1)
  • Chapter 1 Introduction to Databases (p. 3)
  • 1.1 Introduction (p. 4)
  • 1.2 Traditional File-Based Systems (p. 7)
  • 1.3 Database Approach (p. 14)
  • 1.4 Roles in the Database Environment (p. 21)
  • 1.5 History of Database Management Systems (p. 24)
  • 1.6 Advantages and Disadvantages of DBMSs (p. 26)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 31)
  • Review Questions (p. 32)
  • Exercises (p. 32)
  • Chapter 2 Database Environment (p. 33)
  • 2.1 The Three-Level ANSI-SPARC Architecture (p. 34)
  • 2.2 Database Languages (p. 39)
  • 2.3 Data Models and Conceptual Modeling (p. 43)
  • 2.4 Functions of a DBMS (p. 48)
  • 2.5 Components of a DBMS (p. 53)
  • 2.6 Multi-User DBMS Architectures (p. 56)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 64)
  • Review Questions (p. 65)
  • Exercises (p. 65)
  • Part 2 The Relational Model and Languages (p. 67)
  • Chapter 3 The Relational Model (p. 69)
  • 3.1 Brief History of the Relational Model (p. 70)
  • 3.2 Terminology (p. 71)
  • 3.3 Integrity Constraints (p. 81)
  • 3.4 Views (p. 83)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 86)
  • Review Questions (p. 87)
  • Exercises (p. 87)
  • Chapter 4 Relational Algebra and Relational Calculus (p. 88)
  • 4.1 The Relational Algebra (p. 89)
  • 4.2 The Relational Calculus (p. 103)
  • 4.3 Other Languages (p. 109)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 110)
  • Review Questions (p. 110)
  • Exercises (p. 111)
  • Chapter 5 SQL: Data Manipulation (p. 112)
  • 5.1 Introduction to SQL (p. 113)
  • 5.2 Writing SQL Commands (p. 116)
  • 5.3 Data Manipulation (p. 117)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 154)
  • Review Questions (p. 155)
  • Exercises (p. 155)
  • Chapter 6 SQL: Data Definition (p. 157)
  • 6.1 The ISO SQL Data Types (p. 158)
  • 6.2 Integrity Enhancement Feature (p. 164)
  • 6.3 Data Definition (p. 168)
  • 6.4 Views (p. 176)
  • 6.5 Transactions (p. 187)
  • 6.6 Discretionary Access Control (p. 189)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 194)
  • Review Questions (p. 195)
  • Exercises (p. 195)
  • Chapter 7 Query-By-Example (p. 198)
  • 7.1 Introduction to Microsoft Office Access Queries (p. 199)
  • 7.2 Building Select Queries Using QBE (p. 201)
  • 7.3 Using Advanced Queries (p. 208)
  • 7.4 Changing the Content of Tables Using Action Queries (p. 215)
  • Exercises (p. 224)
  • Chapter 8 Commercial RDBMSs: Office Access and Oracle (p. 225)
  • 8.1 Microsoft Office Access 2003 (p. 226)
  • 8.2 Oracle9i (p. 242)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 276)
  • Review Questions (p. 277)
  • Part 3 Database Analysis and Design Techniques (p. 279)
  • Chapter 9 Database Planning, Design, and Administration (p. 281)
  • 9.1 The Information Systems Lifecycle (p. 282)
  • 9.2 The Database System Development Lifecycle (p. 283)
  • 9.3 Database Planning (p. 285)
  • 9.4 System Definition (p. 286)
  • 9.5 Requirements Collection and Analysis (p. 288)
  • 9.6 Database Design (p. 291)
  • 9.7 DBMS Selection (p. 295)
  • 9.8 Application Design (p. 299)
  • 9.9 Prototyping (p. 303)
  • 9.10 Implementation (p. 304)
  • 9.11 Data Conversion and Loading (p. 305)
  • 9.12 Testing (p. 305)
  • 9.13 Operational Maintenance (p. 306)
  • 9.14 CASE Tools (p. 307)
  • 9.15 Data Administration and Database Administration (p. 309)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 311)
  • Review Questions (p. 313)
  • Exercises (p. 313)
  • Chapter 10 Fact-Finding Techniques (p. 314)
  • 10.1 When Are Fact-Finding Techniques Used? (p. 315)
  • 10.2 What Facts Are Collected? (p. 316)
  • 10.3 Fact-Finding Techniques (p. 317)
  • 10.4 Using Fact-Finding Techniques--A Worked Example (p. 321)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 340)
  • Review Questions (p. 341)
  • Exercises (p. 341)
  • Chapter 11 Entity-Relationship Modeling (p. 342)
  • 11.1 Entity Types (p. 343)
  • 11.2 Relationship Types (p. 346)
  • 11.3 Attributes (p. 350)
  • 11.4 Strong and Weak Entity Types (p. 354)
  • 11.5 Attributes on Relationships (p. 355)
  • 11.6 Structural Constraints (p. 356)
  • 11.7 Problems with ER Models (p. 364)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 368)
  • Review Questions (p. 369)
  • Exercises (p. 369)
  • Chapter 12 Enhanced Entity-Relationship Modeling (p. 371)
  • 12.1 Specialization/Generalization (p. 372)
  • 12.2 Aggregation (p. 383)
  • 12.3 Composition (p. 384)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 385)
  • Review Questions (p. 386)
  • Exercises (p. 386)
  • Chapter 13 Normalization (p. 387)
  • 13.1 The Purpose of Normalization (p. 388)
  • 13.2 How Normalization Supports Database Design (p. 389)
  • 13.3 Data Redundancy and Update Anomalies (p. 390)
  • 13.4 Functional Dependencies (p. 392)
  • 13.5 The Process of Normalization (p. 401)
  • 13.6 First Normal Form (1NF) (p. 403)
  • 13.7 Second Normal Form (2NF) (p. 407)
  • 13.8 Third Normal Form (3NF) (p. 408)
  • 13.9 General Definitions of 2NF and 3NF (p. 411)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 412)
  • Review Questions (p. 413)
  • Exercises (p. 413)
  • Chapter 14 Advanced Normalization (p. 415)
  • 14.1 More on Functional Dependencies (p. 416)
  • 14.2 Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF) (p. 419)
  • 14.3 Review of Normalization up to BCNF (p. 422)
  • 14.4 Fourth Normal Form (4NF) (p. 428)
  • 14.5 Fifth Normal Form (5NF) (p. 430)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 433)
  • Review Questions (p. 433)
  • Exercises (p. 433)
  • Part 4 Methodology (p. 435)
  • Chapter 15 Methodology--Conceptual Database Design (p. 437)
  • 15.1 Introduction to the Database Design Methodology (p. 438)
  • 15.2 Overview of the Database Design Methodology (p. 440)
  • 15.3 Conceptual Database Design Methodology (p. 442)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 458)
  • Review Questions (p. 459)
  • Exercises (p. 460)
  • Chapter 16 Methodology--Logical Database Design for the Relational Model (p. 461)
  • 16.1 Logical Database Design Methodology for the Relational Model (p. 462)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 490)
  • Review Questions (p. 491)
  • Exercises (p. 492)
  • Chapter 17 Methodology--Physical Database Design for Relational Databases (p. 494)
  • 17.1 Comparison of Logical and Physical Database Design (p. 495)
  • 17.2 Overview of Physical Database Design Methodology (p. 496)
  • 17.3 The Physical Database Design Methodology for Relational Databases (p. 497)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 517)
  • Review Questions (p. 517)
  • Exercises (p. 518)
  • Chapter 18 Methodology--Monitoring and Tuning the Operational System (p. 519)
  • 18.1 Denormalizing and Introducing Controlled Redundancy (p. 519)
  • 18.2 Monitoring the System to Improve Performance (p. 532)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 537)
  • Review Questions (p. 537)
  • Exercise (p. 537)
  • Part 5 Selected Database Issues (p. 539)
  • Chapter 19 Security (p. 541)
  • 19.1 Database Security (p. 542)
  • 19.2 Countermeasures--Computer-Based Controls (p. 545)
  • 19.3 Security in Microsoft Office Access DBMS (p. 555)
  • 19.4 Security in Oracle DBMS (p. 558)
  • 19.5 DBMSs and Web Security (p. 562)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 570)
  • Review Questions (p. 571)
  • Exercises (p. 571)
  • Chapter 20 Transaction Management (p. 572)
  • 20.1 Transaction Support (p. 573)
  • 20.2 Concurrency Control (p. 577)
  • 20.3 Database Recovery (p. 605)
  • 20.4 Advanced Transaction Models (p. 615)
  • 20.5 Concurrency Control and Recovery in Oracle (p. 622)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 626)
  • Review Questions (p. 627)
  • Exercises (p. 628)
  • Chapter 21 Query Processing (p. 630)
  • 21.1 Overview of Query Processing (p. 631)
  • 21.2 Query Decomposition (p. 635)
  • 21.3 Heuristical Approach to Query Optimization (p. 639)
  • 21.4 Cost Estimation for the Relational Algebra Operations (p. 646)
  • 21.5 Enumeration of Alternative Execution Strategies (p. 665)
  • 21.6 Query Optimization in Oracle (p. 673)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 680)
  • Review Questions (p. 681)
  • Exercises (p. 681)
  • Part 6 Distributed DBMSs and Replication (p. 685)
  • Chapter 22 Distributed DBMSs--Concepts and Design (p. 687)
  • 22.1 Introduction (p. 688)
  • 22.2 Overview of Networking (p. 699)
  • 22.3 Functions and Architectures of a DDBMS (p. 703)
  • 22.4 Distributed Relational Database Design (p. 708)
  • 22.5 Transparencies in a DDBMS (p. 719)
  • 22.6 Date's Twelve Rules for a DDBMS (p. 729)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 731)
  • Review Questions (p. 732)
  • Exercises (p. 732)
  • Chapter 23 Distributed DBMSs--Advanced Concepts (p. 734)
  • 23.1 Distributed Transaction Management (p. 735)
  • 23.2 Distributed Concurrency Control (p. 736)
  • 23.3 Distributed Deadlock Management (p. 741)
  • 23.4 Distributed Database Recovery (p. 744)
  • 23.5 The X/Open Distributed Transaction Processing Model (p. 758)
  • 23.6 Distributed Query Optimization (p. 761)
  • 23.7 Distribution in Oracle (p. 772)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 777)
  • Review Questions (p. 778)
  • Exercises (p. 778)
  • Chapter 24 Replication and Mobile Databases (p. 780)
  • 24.1 Introduction to Database Replication (p. 781)
  • 24.2 Benefits of Database Replication (p. 781)
  • 24.3 Applications of Replication (p. 783)
  • 24.4 Basic Components of Database Replication (p. 783)
  • 24.5 Database Replication Environments (p. 784)
  • 24.6 Replication Servers (p. 788)
  • 24.7 Introduction to Mobile Databases (p. 792)
  • 24.8 Oracle Replication (p. 794)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 799)
  • Review Questions (p. 800)
  • Exercises (p. 800)
  • Part 7 Object DBMSs (p. 801)
  • Chapter 25 Introduction to Object DBMSs (p. 803)
  • 25.1 Advanced Database Applications (p. 804)
  • 25.2 Weaknesses of RDBMSs (p. 809)
  • 25.3 Object-Oriented Concepts (p. 814)
  • 25.4 Storing Objects in a Relational Database (p. 825)
  • 25.5 Next-Generation Database Systems (p. 828)
  • 25.6 Object-Oriented Database Design (p. 830)
  • 25.7 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with UML (p. 836)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 844)
  • Review Questions (p. 845)
  • Exercises (p. 846)
  • Chapter 26 Object-Oriented DBMSs--Concepts (p. 847)
  • 26.1 Introduction to Object-Oriented Data Models and OODBMSs (p. 849)
  • 26.2 OODBMS Perspectives (p. 860)
  • 26.3 Persistence (p. 867)
  • 26.4 Issues in OODBMSs (p. 871)
  • 26.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of OODBMSs (p. 881)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 885)
  • Review Questions (p. 886)
  • Exercises (p. 887)
  • Chapter 27 Object-Oriented DBMSs--Standards and Systems (p. 888)
  • 27.1 Object Management Group (p. 889)
  • 27.2 Object Data Standard ODMG 3.0, 1999 (p. 897)
  • 27.3 ObjectStore (p. 921)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 932)
  • Review Questions (p. 934)
  • Exercises (p. 934)
  • Chapter 28 Object-Relational DBMSs (p. 935)
  • 28.1 Introduction to Object-Relational Database Systems (p. 936)
  • 28.2 The Third-Generation Database Manifestos (p. 939)
  • 28.3 Postgres--An Early ORDBMS (p. 943)
  • 28.4 SQL:1999 and SQL:2003 (p. 946)
  • 28.5 Query Processing and Optimization (p. 974)
  • 28.6 Object-Oriented Extensions in Oracle (p. 978)
  • 28.7 Comparison of ORDBMS and OODBMS (p. 986)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 988)
  • Review Questions (p. 988)
  • Exercises (p. 989)
  • Part 8 Web and DBMSs (p. 991)
  • Chapter 29 Web Technology and DBMSs (p. 993)
  • 29.1 Introduction to the Internet and Web (p. 994)
  • 29.2 The Web (p. 998)
  • 29.3 Scripting Languages (p. 1011)
  • 29.4 Common Gateway Interface (p. 1014)
  • 29.5 HTTP Cookies (p. 1019)
  • 29.6 Extending the Web Server (p. 1020)
  • 29.7 Java (p. 1021)
  • 29.8 Microsoft's Web Platform (p. 1043)
  • 29.9 Oracle Internet Platform (p. 1055)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1062)
  • Review Questions (p. 1063)
  • Exercises (p. 1064)
  • Chapter 30 Semistructured Data and XML (p. 1065)
  • 30.1 Semistructured Data (p. 1066)
  • 30.2 Introduction to XML (p. 1073)
  • 30.3 XML-Related Technologies (p. 1082)
  • 30.4 XML Schema (p. 1091)
  • 30.5 XML Query Languages (p. 1100)
  • 30.6 XML and Databases (p. 1128)
  • 30.7 XML in Oracle (p. 1139)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1142)
  • Review Questions (p. 1144)
  • Exercises (p. 1145)
  • Part 9 Business Intelligence (p. 1147)
  • Chapter 31 Data Warehousing Concepts (p. 1149)
  • 31.1 Introduction to Data Warehousing (p. 1150)
  • 31.2 Data Warehouse Architecture (p. 1156)
  • 31.3 Data Warehouse Data Flows (p. 1161)
  • 31.4 Data Warehousing Tools and Technologies (p. 1165)
  • 31.5 Data Marts (p. 1171)
  • 31.6 Data Warehousing Using Oracle (p. 1175)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1178)
  • Review Questions (p. 1180)
  • Exercise (p. 1180)
  • Chapter 32 Data Warehousing Design (p. 1181)
  • 32.1 Designing a Data Warehouse Database (p. 1182)
  • 32.2 Dimensionality Modeling (p. 1183)
  • 32.3 Database Design Methodology for Data Warehouses (p. 1187)
  • 32.4 Criteria for Assessing the Dimensionality of a Data Warehouse (p. 1195)
  • 32.5 Data Warehousing Design Using Oracle (p. 1196)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1202)
  • Review Questions (p. 1203)
  • Exercises (p. 1203)
  • Chapter 33 OLAP (p. 1204)
  • 33.1 Online Analytical Processing (p. 1205)
  • 33.2 OLAP Applications (p. 1206)
  • 33.3 Representation of Multi-Dimensional Data (p. 1209)
  • 33.4 OLAP Tools (p. 1211)
  • 33.5 OLAP Extensions to the SQL Standard (p. 1217)
  • 33.6 Oracle OLAP (p. 1224)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1230)
  • Review Questions (p. 1231)
  • Exercises (p. 1231)
  • Chapter 34 Data Mining (p. 1232)
  • 34.1 Data Mining (p. 1233)
  • 34.2 Data Mining Techniques (p. 1233)
  • 34.3 The Data Mining Process (p. 1239)
  • 34.4 Data Mining Tools (p. 1241)
  • 34.5 Data Mining and Data Warehousing (p. 1242)
  • 34.6 Oracle Data Mining (ODM) (p. 1242)
  • Chapter Summary (p. 1245)
  • Review Questions (p. 1246)
  • Exercises (p. 1246)
  • Appendices (p. 1247)
  • A Users' Requirements Specification for DreamHome Case Study (p. 1249)
  • A.1 Branch User Views of DreamHome (p. 1249)
  • A.2 Staff User Views of DreamHome (p. 1252)
  • B Other Case Studies (p. 1255)
  • B.1 The University Accommodation Office Case Study (p. 1255)
  • B.2 The EasyDrive School of Motoring Case Study (p. 1258)
  • B.3 The Wellmeadows Hospital Case Study (p. 1260)
  • C File Organizations and Indexes (p. 1268)
  • C.1 Basic Concepts (p. 1269)
  • C.2 Unordered Files (p. 1270)
  • C.3 Ordered Files (p. 1271)
  • C.4 Hash Files (p. 1272)
  • C.5 Indexes (p. 1277)
  • C.6 Clustered and Non-Clustered Tables (p. 1286)
  • C.7 Guidelines for Selecting File Organizations (p. 1288)
  • Appendix Summary (p. 1291)
  • D When is a DBMS Relational? (p. 1293)
  • E Programmatic SQL (p. 1298)
  • E.1 Embedded SQL (p. 1299)
  • E.2 Dynamic SQL (p. 1312)
  • E.3 The Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) Standard (p. 1313)
  • Appendix Summary (p. 1318)
  • Review Questions (p. 1319)
  • Exercises (p. 1319)
  • F Alternative ER Modeling Notations (p. 1320)
  • F.1 ER Modeling Using the Chen Notation (p. 1320)
  • F.2 ER Modeling Using the Crow's Feet Notation (p. 1320)
  • G Summary of the Database Design Methodology for Relational Databases (p. 1326)
  • References (p. 1332)
  • Further Reading (p. 1345)
  • Index (p. 1356)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Both Thomas Connolly and Carolyn Begg have experience of database design in industry, and now apply this in their teaching and research at the University of Paisley in Scotland

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