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Symbolic interactionism : an introduction, an interpretation, an integration / Joel M. Charon

Main Author Charon, Joel M. Country Estados Unidos. Edition 4th ed Publication Englewood Cliffs : Prentice-Hall, cop. 1992 Description VIII, 232 p. ; 23 cm ISBN 0-13-877820-5 CDU 301.151
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca de Ciências da Educação
BCE 301.151 - C Available 321641
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Using a unique step-by-step, integrated approach, this book organizes the basic concepts of symbolic interactionism in such a way that readers understand them clearly and are able to apply them to their own lives. It emphasizes the active side of human beings-humans as definers and users of the environment, humans as problem solvers and in control of their own actions-and it shows students how society makes us, and how we in turn shape society. Each chapter examines a single concept, but relates that concept to the whole perspective and to other concepts in the perspective. Chapter titles include The Perspective of Social Science, Symbolic Interactionism as a Perspective, The Meaning of the Symbol, The Importance of the Symbol, The Nature of Self, The Human Mind, Taking the Role of the Other, Human Action, Social Interaction, and Society. For individuals interested in the study of social psychology and/or social theory.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. xi)
  • 1 The Nature of Perspective (p. 1)
  • New Perspectives Mean New Realities (p. 6)
  • Perspectives Are Socially Created (p. 8)
  • Is There a Best Perspective? (p. 9)
  • Summary (p. 10)
  • Some Examples of Perspectives: Informal and Formal Perspectives (p. 10)
  • References (p. 12)
  • 2 The Perspective of Social Science (p. 13)
  • Social Science As a Perspective (p. 15)
  • Sociology As a Perspective (p. 17)
  • Psychology As a Perspective (p. 19)
  • Commonalities and Differences between Sociology and Psychology (p. 20)
  • The Perspective of Social Psychology in Psychology (p. 21)
  • The Perspective of Social Psychology in Sociology (p. 23)
  • Summary (p. 25)
  • References (p. 26)
  • 3 Symbolic Interactionism As a Perspective (p. 27)
  • Introduction: Five Central Ideas (p. 27)
  • General Historical Background of Symbolic Interactionism (p. 28)
  • Mead and Pragmatism (p. 29)
  • Mead and Darwin (p. 31)
  • Mead and Behaviorism (p. 33)
  • A Contrast With Other Perspectives: Warriner (p. 33)
  • Shibutani: Reference Groups As Perspectives (p. 35)
  • Attitudes Versus Perspectives (p. 37)
  • Summary (p. 39)
  • References (p. 40)
  • 4 The Meaning of the Symbol (p. 41)
  • The Nature of Reality (p. 42)
  • Importance of a Social Defined Reality (p. 43)
  • Objects As "Social Objects" (p. 44)
  • Symbols--A Class of Social Objects (p. 46)
  • Symbols Are Social, Meaningful, and Significant (p. 47)
  • Language (p. 51)
  • Words As Categories (p. 52)
  • Symbols, Perspectives, and Interaction (p. 53)
  • Humans and "Infrahumans" (p. 54)
  • How Animals Approach Environment (p. 55)
  • Symbols versus Signs (p. 56)
  • Summary (p. 57)
  • References (p. 58)
  • 5 The Importance of the Symbol (p. 60)
  • Symbols and Social Reality (p. 60)
  • Symbols and Human Social Life (p. 61)
  • Symbols and the Individual (p. 64)
  • Naming, Memory, Categorizing (p. 64)
  • Perception (p. 65)
  • Thinking (p. 65)
  • Deliberation and Problem Solving (p. 66)
  • Transcendence of Space and Time (p. 66)
  • Transcendence of One's Own Person (p. 67)
  • Abstract Reality (p. 67)
  • Creativity (p. 68)
  • Self-Direction (p. 69)
  • The Importance of Symbols: A Summary (p. 69)
  • References (p. 71)
  • 6 The Nature of the Self (p. 72)
  • Self As a Social Object (p. 72)
  • Self As Social: Four Social Stages of Self-Development (p. 74)
  • The Preparatory Stage (p. 75)
  • The Play Stage (p. 75)
  • The Game Stage (p. 76)
  • The Reference Group Stage (p. 77)
  • Selves as Ever-Changing Social Objects (p. 78)
  • Self As Object (p. 79)
  • 1. Action Toward Self: Self-Communication (p. 80)
  • 2. Action Toward Self: Self-Perception (p. 81)
  • Self-Perception: Assessment of Our Own Action (p. 81)
  • Self-Perception: The Development of Self-Concept (p. 82)
  • Self-Perception: Self-Judgment, One Aspect of Self-Concept (p. 82)
  • Self-Perception: Identity, One Aspect of Self-Concept (p. 86)
  • 3. Action Toward Self: Self-Control (p. 88)
  • Central Ideas About the Self (p. 90)
  • The Self and the Symbolic Interactionist Perspective (p. 91)
  • The "I" and the "Me" (p. 92)
  • Summary (p. 94)
  • References (p. 94)
  • 7 The Human Mind (p. 97)
  • The Meaning of Mind: Symbolic Interaction Toward Self (p. 97)
  • Mind Action: Making Indications Toward Self (p. 99)
  • Mind Action: The Ability to Control Overt Action (p. 100)
  • Mind Action: The Ability to Problem Solve (p. 102)
  • Mind Action Is Part of All Social Interaction (p. 104)
  • Summary (p. 106)
  • References (p. 107)
  • 8 Taking the Role of the Other (p. 109)
  • Description of the Concept (p. 109)
  • Role Taking's Relationship to Self, Mind, and Symbols (p. 111)
  • Self (p. 112)
  • Mind (p. 112)
  • Symbols (p. 113)
  • Role Taking (p. 113)
  • The Importance of Role Taking (p. 114)
  • Its Central Place in All Social Interaction (p. 114)
  • Nine Ways Role Taking Is Central to All Human Life (p. 115)
  • And If We Don't Role Take--So What? (p. 119)
  • Summary (p. 120)
  • References (p. 122)
  • 9 Human Action (p. 124)
  • The "Stream of Action" (p. 124)
  • The Act (p. 126)
  • Action, Goals, and Social Objects (p. 128)
  • Mead's Four Stages of the Act (p. 130)
  • Stage 1 Impulse (p. 130)
  • Stage 2 Perception (p. 131)
  • Stage 3 Manipulation (p. 131)
  • Stage 4 Consummation (p. 132)
  • A Brief Look at the Four Stages (p. 132)
  • Locating the "Cause" of Human Action (p. 133)
  • The Definition of the Situation (p. 136)
  • Habitual Action (p. 137)
  • Action and Emotions (p. 142)
  • The Role of the Past in Human Action (p. 138)
  • The Role of the Future in Human Action (p. 139)
  • Action and Motives (p. 140)
  • Action and Choice (p. 145)
  • Summary (p. 145)
  • References (p. 146)
  • 10 Social Interaction (p. 149)
  • Social Action (p. 149)
  • The Meaning of Social Interaction (p. 150)
  • Mutual Social Action (p. 150)
  • Social Interaction Is Symbolic (p. 151)
  • Social Interaction Involves Role Taking (p. 153)
  • The General Importance of Social Interaction (p. 153)
  • 1. Social Interaction Forms Our Basic Human Qualities (p. 154)
  • 2. Social Interaction Is an Important Cause of Human Action (p. 155)
  • 3. Social Interaction Shapes Identities (p. 160)
  • We Label One Another in Social Interaction (p. 160)
  • We Attempt to Shape Identities in Social Interaction (p. 161)
  • We Shape Our Own Identities in Social Interaction (p. 164)
  • 4. Social Interaction Creates Society (p. 165)
  • Summary (p. 165)
  • References (p. 166)
  • 11 Society (p. 168)
  • Groups, Organizations, Social Worlds, and Societies (p. 169)
  • 1. Society Is Symbolic Interaction (p. 170)
  • 2. Society Is Symbolic Interaction That Is Characterized by Cooperative Action (p. 171)
  • 3. Society Is Social Interaction That Is Symbolic, That Is Characterized by Cooperation, and That Develops Culture (p. 175)
  • Culture Is a Shared Perspective (p. 175)
  • Culture Is a Generalized Other (p. 175)
  • Culture Maintains Society (p. 176)
  • Culture Is Ever Changing (p. 178)
  • The Individual Exists Within Many Societies (p. 179)
  • The Active Human Being in Society (p. 182)
  • Summary (p. 184)
  • References (p. 185)
  • 12 Erving Goffman (p. 187)
  • Goffman and Symbolic Interactionism (p. 187)
  • Drama in Interaction (p. 188)
  • Impressions and Performance (p. 188)
  • Performance Teams (p. 190)
  • Reaction to Goffman's Dramaturgical View (p. 191)
  • The Self of Social Interaction (p. 192)
  • Goffman's View of Self (p. 192)
  • Social Control and Self (p. 192)
  • Rituals of Interaction (p. 195)
  • The Meaning of Ritual (p. 195)
  • The Importance of Ritual (p. 196)
  • The Environments of Social Interaction (p. 198)
  • Summary (p. 200)
  • References (p. 201)
  • 13 Symbolic Interactionism: A Final Assessment (p. 202)
  • Symbolic Interactionism and Human Freedom: A Review (p. 203)
  • Symbolic Interactionism and Science (p. 206)
  • Symbolic Interactionism: Some Representative Studies (p. 209)
  • A Study of Pregnant Drug Users (p. 209)
  • A Study of Sam's Definition of Pain and Injury (p. 211)
  • A Study of Identity Formation in a Maximum Security Prison (p. 212)
  • A Study of Orthodox Synagogue Life (p. 213)
  • A Study of Little League Baseball (p. 215)
  • A Study of Bachelorhood and Conversion (p. 215)
  • Symbolic Interactionism: Some Examples of Application (p. 216)
  • An Understanding of Society (p. 218)
  • An Understanding of Racism in Society (p. 218)
  • An Understanding of Gender Differences (p. 221)
  • An Understanding of Dating, Marriage, and Family (p. 222)
  • An Understanding of Childhood Socialization (p. 223)
  • Symbolic Interactionism: A View of the College Experience (p. 225)
  • Symbolic Interactionism: A Final Look at Application (p. 226)
  • The Importance of the Symbolic Interactionist Perspective (p. 227)
  • Summary (p. 229)
  • References (p. 230)
  • Index (p. 231)

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