Normal view MARC view ISBD view

God and philosophy / Etienne Gilson; with a foreword by Jaroslav Pelikan

Main Author Gilson, Etienne, 1884-1978 Secondary Author Pelikan, Jaroslav Country Reino Unido. Edition 2nd ed Publication New Haven : Yale Nota Bene, cop. 2002 Description XXVIII, 147 p. ; 20 cm ISBN 0-300-09299-7 CDU 19 GILSON 291.1 231.11
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca Vitor Aguiar e Silva
BVAS 19 GILSON - G Indisponível | Not available 315311
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In this classic work, the eminent Catholic philosopher Étienne Gilson deals with one of the most important and perplexing metaphysical problems: the relation between our notion of God and demonstrations of his existence. Gilson examines Greek, Christian, and modern philosophy as well as the thinking that has grown out of our age of science in this fundamental analysis of the problem of God.

"[I] commend to another generation of seekers and students this deeply earnest and yet wistfully gentle little essay on the most important (and often, at least nowadays, the most neglected) of all metaphysical--and existential--questions. . . . The historical sweep is breathtaking, the one-liners arresting, and the style, both intellectual and literary, altogether engaging." --Jaroslav Pelikan, from the foreword

"We have come to expect from the pen of M. Gilson not only an accurate exposition of the thought of the great philosophers, ancient and modern, but what is of much more importance and of greater interest, a keen and sympathetic insight into the reasons for that thought. The present volume does not fail to fulfill our expectations. It should be read by every Christian thinker." --Ralph O. Dates, America

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in Paris, Etienne Gilson was educated at the University of Paris. He became professor of medieval philosophy at the Sorbonne in 1921, and in 1932 was appointed to the chair in medieval philosophy at the College de France. In 1929 he cooperated with the members of the Congregation of Priests of St. Basil, in Toronto, Canada, to found the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies in association with St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto. Gilson served as professor and director of studies at the institute.

Like his fellow countryman Jacques Maritain, Etienne Gilson was a neo-Thomist for whom Christian revelation is an indispensable auxiliary to reason, and on faith he accepted Christian doctrine as advocated by the Roman Catholic church. At the same time, like St. Thomas Aquinas, he accorded reason a wide compass of operation, maintaining that it could demonstrate the existence of God and the necessity of revelation, with which he considered it compatible.

Why anything exists is a question that science cannot answer and may even deem senseless. Gilson found the answer to be that "each and every particular existing thing depends for its existence on a pure Act of existence." God is the supreme Act of existing. An authority on the Christian philosophy of the Middle Ages, Gilson lectured widely on theology, art, the history of ideas, and the medieval world.

(Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.