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Sedimentary petrology : an introduction to the origin of sedimentary rocks / Maurice E. Tucker

Main Author Tucker, Maurice E. Country Reino Unido. Edition 3rd ed Publication London : Blackwell Science, cop. 2001 Description IX, 262 p. : il. ; 25 cm ISBN 0-632-05735-1 CDU 552.5
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 552.5 - T Available 312712
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 552.5 - T Available 312713
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 552.5 - T Available 312714

Licenciatura em Geologia Petrologia Sedimentar 1º semestre

Licenciatura em Biologia e Geologia Petrologia II 1º semestre

Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The earlier editions of this book have been used by successive generations of students for more than 20 years, and it is the standard text on the subject in most British universities and many others throughout the world.

The study of sediments and sedimentary rocks continues to be a core topic in the Earth Sciences and this book aims to provide a concise account of their composition, mineralogy, textures, structures, diagenesis and depositional environments.

This latest edition is noteworthy for the inclusion of 16 plates with 54 colour photomicrographs of sedimentary rocks in thin-section. These bring sediments to life and show their beauty and colorful appearance down the microscope; they will aid the student enormously in laboratory petrographic work. The text has been revised where necessary and the reference and further reading lists brought up-to-date. New tables have been included to help undergraduates with rock and thin-section description and interpretation.

New 16-page colour section will mean students do not need to buy Longman Atlas All illustrations redrawn to higher standard Complete revision of text - new material on sedimentary geochemistry, etc

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the third edition (p. vii)
  • Preface to the second edition (p. viii)
  • Preface to the first edition (p. ix)
  • 1 Introduction: basic concepts and methodology (p. 1)
  • 1.1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1.2 Basic concepts (p. 1)
  • 1.3 Methodology (p. 6)
  • 2 Siliciclastic sediments I: sandstones, conglomerates and breccias (p. 11)
  • 2.1 Introduction (p. 11)
  • 2.2 Sediment texture (p. 11)
  • 2.3 Sedimentary structures (p. 21)
  • 2.4 Palaeocurrent analysis (p. 40)
  • 2.5 Detrital components of siliciclastic sediments (p. 42)
  • 2.6 Classification of siliciclastic sediments (p. 48)
  • 2.7 Petrography and origin of principal sandstone types (p. 50)
  • 2.8 Sandstone composition, provenance and tectonic setting (p. 53)
  • 2.9 Sandstone diagenesis (p. 55)
  • 2.10 Porosity and permeability (p. 62)
  • 2.11 Depositional environments of sandstones and coarser clastics (p. 65)
  • 3 Siliciclastic sediments II: mudrocks (p. 92)
  • 3.1 Introduction (p. 92)
  • 3.2 Textures and structures of mudrocks (p. 92)
  • 3.3 The colour of mudrocks (p. 96)
  • 3.4 Mineral constituents of mudrocks (p. 97)
  • 3.5 The formation and distribution of clay minerals in modern sediments (p. 99)
  • 3.6 Diagenesis of clay minerals and mudrocks (p. 102)
  • 3.7 Mudrocks and their depositional environments (p. 103)
  • 4 Limestones (p. 110)
  • 4.1 Introduction (p. 110)
  • 4.2 Mineralogy of carbonate sediments (p. 111)
  • 4.3 Components of limestones (p. 111)
  • 4.4 Classification of limestones (p. 128)
  • 4.5 Limestone grain size and texture (p. 130)
  • 4.6 Sedimentary structures of limestones (p. 130)
  • 4.7 Carbonate diagenesis (p. 134)
  • 4.8 Dolomitization, dedolomitization and silicification (p. 146)
  • 4.9 Porosity in carbonate sediments (p. 151)
  • 4.10 Carbonate depositional environments and facies (p. 151)
  • 5 Evaporites (p. 166)
  • 5.1 Introduction (p. 166)
  • 5.2 Gypsum and anhydrite (p. 169)
  • 5.3 Halite (p. 174)
  • 5.4 Other evaporite minerals and their occurrence (p. 176)
  • 5.5 Evaporite dissolution and replacement (p. 178)
  • 5.6 Evaporite sequences and discussion (p. 178)
  • 6 Sedimentary iron deposits (p. 182)
  • 6.1 Introduction (p. 182)
  • 6.2 Source and transportation of iron (p. 182)
  • 6.3 The formation of the principal iron minerals (p. 183)
  • 6.4 Occurrence and petrography of the iron minerals (p. 186)
  • 6.5 Precambrian iron-formations and Phanerozoic ironstones (p. 189)
  • 6.6 Bog iron ores (p. 192)
  • 6.7 Ferromanganese nodules and crusts, and metalliferous sediments (p. 192)
  • 7 Sedimentary phosphate deposits (p. 194)
  • 7.1 Introduction (p. 194)
  • 7.2 Mineralogy (p. 194)
  • 7.3 Nodular and bedded phosphorites (p. 194)
  • 7.4 Bioclastic and pebble-bed phosphorites (p. 197)
  • 7.5 Guano and ocean-island phosphorites (p. 198)
  • 8 Coal, oil shale and petroleum (p. 199)
  • 8.1 Introduction (p. 199)
  • 8.2 Modern organic deposits (p. 199)
  • 8.3 Ancient organic deposits (p. 200)
  • 8.4 Coals and the coal series (p. 200)
  • 8.5 Coal petrology (p. 202)
  • 8.6 Coal formation and rank (p. 204)
  • 8.7 Occurrence of coal (p. 205)
  • 8.8 Oil shales (p. 206)
  • 8.9 Formation of kerogen (p. 207)
  • 8.10 Petroleum (p. 207)
  • 9 Cherts and siliceous sediments (p. 212)
  • 9.1 Introduction (p. 212)
  • 9.2 Chert petrology (p. 212)
  • 9.3 Bedded cherts (p. 212)
  • 9.4 Nodular cherts (p. 218)
  • 9.5 Non-marine siliceous sediments and cherts (p. 219)
  • 10 Volcaniclastic sediments (p. 221)
  • 10.1 Introduction (p. 221)
  • 10.2 Autoclastic deposits (p. 222)
  • 10.3 Pyroclastic-fall deposits (p. 223)
  • 10.4 Pyroclastic-flow and -surge deposits (p. 224)
  • 10.5 Hydroclastites: hyaloclastites and hyalotuffs (p. 226)
  • 10.6 Epiclastic volcanogenic deposits (p. 228)
  • 10.7 Diagenesis of volcaniclastic sediments (p. 228)
  • References (p. 231)
  • Index (p. 251)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Maurice Edwin Tucker is a leading British sedimentologist, specialising in the field of carbonate sedimentology, more commonly known as limestones. From 1993 to 2011 he held the position of Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Durham, and from 1998 to 2011 was Master of University College, Durham.

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