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The anxiety of influence : a theory of poetry / Harold Bloom

Main Author Bloom, Harold, 1930- Country Estados Unidos. Edition 2nd ed Publication New York : Oxford University Press, 1997 Description XLVII, 155 p. ; 21 cm ISBN 0-19-511221-0 CDU 82-1 82.0
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca Vitor Aguiar e Silva
BVAS 82-1 - B Indisponível | Not available 307289
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUMD 118946 Available 308725
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Harold Bloom's The Anxiety of Influence has cast its own long shadow of influence since it was first published in 1973. Through an insightful study of Romantic poets, Bloom puts forth his central vision of the relations between tradition and the individual artist. Although Bloom was never theleader of any critical "camp," his argument that all literary texts are a response to those that precede them had an enormous impact on the practice of deconstruction and poststructuralist literary theory in this country. The book remains a central work of criticism for all students of literatureand has sold over 17,000 copies in paperback since 1984. Written in a moving personal style, anchored by concrete examples, and memorably quotable, Bloom's book maintains that the anxiety of influence cannot be evaded--neither by poets nor by responsible readers and critics.This second edition contains a new Introduction, which explains the genesis of Bloom's thinking and the subsequent influence of the book on literary criticism of the past twenty years.criticism of the past twenty years. Here, Bloom asserts that the anxiety of influence comes out of a complex actof strong misreading, a creative interpretation he calls "poetic misprision." The influence-anxiety does not so much concern the forerunner but rather is an anxiety achieved in and by the story, novel, play, poem, or essay. In other words, without Keats's reading of Shakespeare, Milton, andWordsworth, we could not have Keats's odes and sonnets and his two Hyperions.Given the enormous attention generated by Bloom's controversial The Western Cannon, this new edition is certain to find a readymade audience among the new generation of scholars, students, and layreaders interested in the Bloom cannon.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Harold Bloom was born on July 11, 1930 in New York City. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from Cornell in 1951 and his Doctorate from Yale in 1955.

After graduating from Yale, Bloom remained there as a teacher, and was made Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1983. Bloom's theories have changed the way that critics think of literary tradition and has also focused his attentions on history and the Bible. He has written over twenty books and edited countless others. He is one of the most famous critics in the world and considered an expert in many fields. In 2010 he became a founding patron of Ralston College, a new institution in Savannah, Georgia, that focuses on primary texts.

His works include Fallen Angels, Till I End My Song: A Gathering of Last Poems, Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of The King James Bible.

Harold Bloom passed away on October 14, 2019 in New Haven, at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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