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Uganda's recovery : the role of farms, firms, and government / ed. Ritva Reinikka, Paul Collier

Secondary Author Reinikka, Ritva
Collier, Paul
Country Estados Unidos. Publication Washington : World Bank, 2001 Description XV, 491 p. : il. gráficos ; 24 cm ISBN 0-8213-4664-4 CDU 338(676.1)
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUMD 21783 Available 291535
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Uganda's recovery over the past 15 years from economic decline, conflict, and repressive government to macroeconomic stability, high growth, and considerable political freedom signifies a major turnaround in Africa. What makes Uganda's postconflict recovery significant is that it coincides with one of the most ambitious programs of economic liberalization on the African continent.This book focuses on postconflict recovery and economic liberalization. This book also provides a detailed discussion of the many issues policymakers have to consider when they try to guide a country out of a tragic past. It highlights the complexity of the interconnections and tradeoffs involved. The responses of a wide range of actors in the economy, namely, households, firms, and the government are analyzed.This book brings together a number of mostly microeconomic studies on the Ugandan experience of postconflict recovery and economic liberalization. The individual studies incorporate the most recent thinking, theory, and analytical techniques in a number of areas and apply them to one country.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgments (p. ix)
  • Contributors (p. xi)
  • Foreword (p. xiii)
  • Map of Uganda (p. xvi)
  • 1. Introduction (p. 1)
  • Postconflict Recovery and Macroeconomic Reforms (p. 5)
  • Households (p. 6)
  • Firms (p. 7)
  • Government (p. 8)
  • Sustainability and Lessons (p. 10)
  • References (p. 11)
  • Part I. Postconflict Recovery and Macroeconomic Reforms (p. 13)
  • 2. Reconstruction and Liberalization: An Overview (p. 15)
  • The Inheritance of Disorder (p. 16)
  • The Restoration of Peace (p. 21)
  • Growth Policies in the Context of the Postconflict Economy (p. 24)
  • Economic Liberalization (p. 31)
  • Impact on Investment and Exports (p. 38)
  • The Role of Aid (p. 39)
  • Conclusions (p. 44)
  • References (p. 45)
  • 3. Exchange Reforms, Stabilization, and Fiscal Management (p. 49)
  • Exchange Reforms (p. 50)
  • Legalizing the Parallel Market and Exchange Rate Unification (p. 52)
  • The Achievement of Macroeconomic Stability (p. 56)
  • Planning and Implementing Fiscal Policy (p. 58)
  • Targets, Tradeoffs, and Costs in Macroeconomic Management (p. 71)
  • Conclusions (p. 76)
  • References (p. 77)
  • Part II. Household Responses and Constraints (p. 81)
  • 4. Changes in Poverty and Inequality (p. 83)
  • Changes in Mean Consumption Per Capita (p. 87)
  • Defining an Absolute Poverty Line for Uganda (p. 89)
  • Sectoral Decomposition of Poverty Changes (p. 105)
  • Summary and Conclusions (p. 111)
  • Annex 4.1. Methodology (p. 113)
  • References (p. 119)
  • 5. Rural Households: Incomes, Productivity, and Nonfarm Enterprises (p. 123)
  • A Panorama of Rural Uganda (p. 124)
  • Intertemporal Changes in Household Income (p. 137)
  • Agricultural Productivity and Nonfarm Enterprises (p. 143)
  • Conclusions (p. 152)
  • Annex 5.1. Tables of Estimation Results (p. 154)
  • References (p. 174)
  • 6. Crop Markets and Household Participation (p. 177)
  • Market Participation in the Early 1990s (p. 178)
  • A Market Model for Community Trade (p. 180)
  • The Determinants of Market Participation (p. 191)
  • The Effects of Price Changes on Household Welfare (p. 194)
  • Are Crop Markets Developing? (p. 195)
  • Conclusions and Policy Implications (p. 202)
  • Annex 6.1. Calculating Household Welfare (p. 203)
  • References (p. 203)
  • Part III. Firm Responses and Constraints (p. 205)
  • 7. Confronting Competition: Investment, Profit, and Risk (p. 207)
  • Investment Response (p. 209)
  • Constraints to Investment (p. 216)
  • Conclusions and Policy Recommendations (p. 226)
  • Annex 7.1. Data and Estimation Results (p. 228)
  • Annex 7.2. Derivation of the Investment Equation (p. 231)
  • References (p. 232)
  • 8. Productivity and Exports (p. 235)
  • Trade Liberalization, Exports, and Productivity (p. 236)
  • Enterprise Responses to Changing Incentives (p. 238)
  • Export Response (p. 246)
  • Conclusions (p. 252)
  • Annex 8.1. Productivity Measures (p. 253)
  • References (p. 265)
  • Part IV. Government Performance from a Beneficiary Perspective (p. 269)
  • 9. A Quest for Revenue and Tax Incidence (p. 271)
  • Revenue Trends and Tax Reforms (p. 276)
  • Method and Data for Tax Incidence Analysis (p. 278)
  • Tax Incidence on Households (p. 280)
  • Marginal Effective Tax Rate for Firms (p. 281)
  • Cross-Border Comparison for Foreign Firms (p. 288)
  • Compliance and Tax Administration (p. 292)
  • Conclusions (p. 295)
  • Annex 9.1. Household Incidence Analysis and the Concept of Welfare Dominance (p. 296)
  • Annex 9.2. Marginal Effective Tax Rate (p. 298)
  • Annex 9.3. Figures and Tables for Household Incidence and METR (p. 302)
  • References (p. 316)
  • 10. The Cost of Doing Business: Firms' Experience with Corruption (p. 319)
  • The Data (p. 321)
  • Incidence, Level, and Effects of Corruption (p. 321)
  • Case Studies (p. 331)
  • Conclusions (p. 334)
  • Annex 10.1. Ranking of Constraints and Payment of Bribes (p. 336)
  • References (p. 340)
  • 11. Recovery in Service Delivery: Evidence from Schools and Health Centers (p. 343)
  • Diagnostic Survey (p. 346)
  • Education and Public Spending (p. 347)
  • Health Care and Public Spending (p. 363)
  • Conclusions and Policy Changes (p. 366)
  • References (p. 368)
  • 12. What Can We Expect from Universal Primary Education? (p. 371)
  • Access to Education Prior to the UPE Initiative (p. 373)
  • Returns to Education: Productivity and Labor Allocation Effects (p. 378)
  • Effects of UPE on School Quality (p. 395)
  • Summary and Conclusions (p. 400)
  • Annex 12.1. Models (p. 401)
  • References (p. 402)
  • 13. Combating Illness (p. 407)
  • Health Policy and Access to Services (p. 409)
  • Burden of Disease (p. 414)
  • Demand for Curative and Preventive Services (p. 423)
  • Conclusions and the Way Forward (p. 430)
  • Annex 13.1. Data and Estimation Results (p. 433)
  • References (p. 444)
  • Part V. Sustainability and Lessons (p. 451)
  • 14. Beyond Recovery (p. 453)
  • References (p. 460)
  • Appendixes
  • A. Household Surveys (p. 463)
  • B. The Uganda Enterprise Survey (p. 467)
  • References (p. 473)
  • List of Tables, Figures, and Boxes (p. 475)
  • Index (p. 481)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Citing Uganda as the success story of postconflict recovery in Africa, this comprehensive collection of essays traces economic recovery (1986-2000) from the perspective of the government, the individual firm, and the agricultural household. Detailed household and firm-level data are used, supplementing traditional macroeconomic analysis, to evaluate Uganda's liberalization and its effects on individual sectors as well as the overall economy. Concerning the details of liberalization, there is much to gain from reading this book. For example, two large samples offering cross-sectional data on households is an overdue venue to study how particular households respond over time to reforms. Furthermore, extensive interviews outline the specifics of government corruption at the firm level. However, the book's optimistic assessment obscures, at times, potential problems concerning the ongoing recovery. More critically, substantively little is offered on how Uganda will move beyond simple recovery. Recovery is one thing; sustainable development is quite another. Unfortunately, Africa is in desperate need of the former, and this is what makes this book an important addition to the literature. Strongly recommended for experienced researchers and policy makers interested in Africa's economic development. Graduate, research, and professional collections. J. M. Warner College of Wooster

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