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The psychology of criminal conduct / D. A. Andrews, James Bonta

Main Author Andrews, Donald Arthur, 1941- Coauthor Bonta, James Country Estados Unidos. Edition 2nd ed Publication Cincinnati : Anderson Publishing, cop. 1998 Description XI, 423 p. ; 26 cm ISBN 0-87084-712-0 CDU 343.95
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUMD 129985 Available 259224

Licenciatura em Criminologia e Justiça Criminal Psicologia Criminal e do Ofensor 2º semestre

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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

An undergraduate criminology textbook that focuses on the individual differences in criminal activity. Topics include social class and criminal conduct, exploring variability in criminal conduct, psychodynamic and control theory, developmental aspects of criminal behavior, exceptional offenders, and a general personality and social psychology of criminal conduct. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the Third Edition (p. iii)
  • Preface to the Second Edition (p. v)
  • Chapter 1 An Overview of the Psychology of Criminal Conduct (p. 1)
  • Objectives of the Psychology of Criminal Conduct (PCC) (p. 2)
  • The Focus: Variation in Criminal Conduct (p. 2)
  • Types of Understanding Sought (p. 4)
  • PCC and General Human Psychology (p. 11)
  • PCC and Criminology (p. 16)
  • Aggregated Crime Rates as a Reflection of the Behavior of Individuals (p. 17)
  • Ecological Fallacy (p. 18)
  • Social Context as a Moderator of Individual Differences (p. 23)
  • PCC and the Psychology of Criminal Justice (p. 26)
  • Objections to the Goals of PCC (p. 28)
  • A Summary and Look Ahead (p. 34)
  • Chapter 2 Defining Criminal Behavior and Exploring Variability in Criminal Conduct (p. 37)
  • Defining Criminal Behavior (p. 38)
  • Exploring Variability in Criminal Behavior (p. 44)
  • Inferring Individual Differences from Aggregated Crime Rates (p. 44)
  • Inferring Individual Differences from Surveys of a Criminal Past (p. 46)
  • Inferring Individual Differences from Prospective Longitudinal Studies (p. 48)
  • Some Longitudinal Studies of Recidivism in Correctional Samples (p. 53)
  • Criminal Careers (p. 54)
  • Empirical Knowledge of Covariates (p. 55)
  • The Correlates of Crime: Differentiation Among Groups Known to Differ in their Criminal History (p. 58)
  • Predictor Variables: True Prediction in a Longitudinal Design (p. 60)
  • Dynamic Predictors (p. 62)
  • Causal/Functional Variables (p. 63)
  • Knowledge Through the Study of Practice (p. 66)
  • Illustrations of Observed Sources of Variability Through Meta-Analyses (p. 69)
  • Some Meta-Analytic Studies of Social Class of Origin (p. 71)
  • Reviews of Personality and Crime (p. 78)
  • Schuessler and Cressey (1950) (p. 79)
  • Waldo and Dinitz (1967) (p. 79)
  • Tennenbaum (1977) (p. 79)
  • Experimental Studies of the Dynamic Validity of Risk Factors and General Applicability (p. 86)
  • Multi-Domain Assessment of Major Risk Factors and General Applicability (p. 89)
  • Experimental Investigations of the Effectiveness of Correctional Treatment: A Quick Look at What Works (p. 91)
  • Summary (p. 98)
  • Chapter 3 Understanding Through Theory: Toward Social Learning Through Psychodynamic, Social Location, and Differential Association Perspectives (p. 101)
  • Psychopathological Perspectives (p. 102)
  • Psychodynamic Conceptions of Human Behavior (p. 104)
  • Environmental Barriers to Development (p. 107)
  • The Immediate Environment, the Situation of Action, and the Psychological Moment (p. 107)
  • Types of Offenders in Psychoanalytic Theory (p. 108)
  • Psychodynamic Thought and Recent Psychological Advances (p. 113)
  • Reformulations of Psychodynamic Theory (p. 114)
  • Variations on Psychodynamic Themes in Control Theories (p. 119)
  • Recent Variations on Psychodynamic Themes (p. 125)
  • Summary to This Point (p. 131)
  • Toward Social Learning via Frustration-Aggression, Class-Based, and Differential Association Theory (p. 132)
  • From Freud to Social Learning: Frustration-Aggression (p. 132)
  • The Rise of Social learning Theory (p. 133)
  • Megargee's Algebra of Aggression (p. 134)
  • Class-Based Sociological Theory: Social Location, Social Reaction, and Inequality (p. 135)
  • Anomie/Strain Theory (p. 136)
  • Subcultural Perspectives in the Bold Sociological Mode (p. 141)
  • Labeling and Marxist Perspectives in the Bold Sociological Mode (p. 142)
  • Uncovering Social Psychological Value in Sociological Criminology (p. 143)
  • Theories of the Motivational Variety: Subcultural Versions (p. 143)
  • The Content of Criminal Subcultures (p. 144)
  • From Differential Association to Social Learning (p. 147)
  • Summary (p. 157)
  • Chapter 4 The General Personality and Social Psychological Approach: A Personal, Interpersonal, and Community-Reinforcement Perspective (p. 159)
  • A Personal, Interpersonal, and Community-Reinforcement (PIC-R) Perspective on Criminal Conduct (p. 165)
  • Antecedent and Consequent Control (p. 168)
  • Sources of Control (p. 173)
  • Relationship to Other Theories (p. 175)
  • Summary (p. 178)
  • Chapter 5 Developmental Aspects of Criminal Behavior (p. 179)
  • The Biological Basis of Criminal Behavior (p. 181)
  • Genetics and Crime (p. 181)
  • The Energetic, Impulsive, Sensation-Seeking Temperament (p. 186)
  • Other Biological Correlates of Criminal Behavior (p. 190)
  • Cognitive Development (p. 192)
  • Intelligence as a Correlate of Crime (p. 193)
  • Interpreting the IQ-Crime Relationship (p. 194)
  • Targeting Academic Achievement in Treatment (p. 196)
  • Social, Practical Intelligence (p. 198)
  • Interpersonal Attachments and the Development of Social Bonds (p. 204)
  • Parenting Practices, Family Interventions, and Delinquency (p. 208)
  • Neighborhood Context and Crime (p. 209)
  • When Families Lose Control: The Influence of Delinquent Peers (p. 210)
  • Have Family Interventions Been Able to Reduce Subsequent Delinquent Behavior? (p. 214)
  • Summary (p. 222)
  • Chapter 6 Prediction of Criminal Behavior and Classification of Offenders (p. 225)
  • Assessing Predictive Accuracy (p. 226)
  • The Prediction of Dangerous Behavior: An Impossible Task? (p. 232)
  • Obstacles to Effective Risk Prediction (p. 233)
  • Social Learning and Prediction (p. 240)
  • Third-Generation Risk-Needs Assessments (p. 242)
  • The Wisconsin Risk and Needs Assessment (p. 242)
  • The Level of Service Inventory-Revised (p. 244)
  • The Role of General Personality Assessment in Offender Classification (p. 253)
  • Atheoretical Assessments of Personality (p. 253)
  • Theory-based Approaches to the Assessment of Personality (p. 256)
  • Some Concluding Comments on Personality-Based Assessments (p. 258)
  • Classification for Treatment (p. 259)
  • The Risk Principle (p. 260)
  • The Need Principle (p. 261)
  • The Responsivity Principle (p. 262)
  • The Role of the Professional and the Integrity of Assessment (p. 264)
  • Summary (p. 265)
  • Chapter 7 Prevention and Rehabilitation (p. 273)
  • From Idealism to "Nothing Works" and Back to Human Service: The How and Why of "Nothing Works" (p. 275)
  • The Martinson "Nothing Works" Debate (p. 278)
  • Meta-Analytic Reviews of Treatment Effectiveness (p. 284)
  • Theory and Intervention (p. 296)
  • Psychodynamic Theory and Psychotherapy (p. 298)
  • Labeling, Conflict, and Due Process Theory (p. 299)
  • Subcultural and Differential Association Theory (p. 301)
  • Behavioral and Social Learning Approaches (p. 306)
  • The Dimensions of Effective Correctional Counseling: The "What and How" of Effective Modeling and Reinforcement (p. 311)
  • Knowledge Construction and Knowledge Destruction in Three Parts (p. 319)
  • Part 1 Can the Contributions of Appropriate Treatment Survive Controls for Competing Variables? (p. 319)
  • Part 2 How Applicable Are the Findings Regarding Appropriate Treatment with Different Types of Cases? (p. 321)
  • Part 3 How Practical are the Findings for the Real World? (p. 323)
  • Summary (p. 326)
  • Chapter 8 Getting Mean, Getting Even, Getting Justice: Punishment and the Search for Alternatives (p. 329)
  • Criminal Justice Sanctions and Just Deserts (p. 329)
  • The Effects of Imprisonment on Crime (p. 331)
  • Evaluations of Intermediate Sanctions (p. 336)
  • The Unfulfilled Promise of Fairness (p. 339)
  • Breaking Bad Habits (p. 340)
  • Why Doesn't Punishment Work? (p. 341)
  • Condition 1 Maximum Intensity (p. 342)
  • Condition 2 Immediacy (p. 343)
  • Condition 3 Consistency (p. 343)
  • Condition 4 No Escape or Reinforced Alternatives (p. 344)
  • Condition 5 The Density of Punishment Must Outweigh the Density of Reinforcement (p. 345)
  • Condition 6 The Effectiveness of Punishment Interacts with Person Variables (p. 346)
  • The Side Effects of Punishment (p. 347)
  • Psychology's Shift Away from Punishment (p. 348)
  • Summary on Punishment (p. 350)
  • The Rise of Restorative Justice: An Alternative to Retribution (p. 350)
  • Summary (p. 356)
  • Chapter 9 Exceptional Offenders (p. 357)
  • The Mentally Disordered Offender (MDO) (p. 357)
  • Estimating the Prevalence of Mental Disorders (p. 359)
  • Dangerousness and the MDO (p. 360)
  • The Prediction of Criminal Behavior Among MDOs (p. 364)
  • Treatment of the MDO (p. 366)
  • Antisocial Personality Disorder, Psychopathy, and Antisocial Personality Pattern (p. 368)
  • Hare's Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) (p. 371)
  • PCL-R and the Prediction of Criminal Behavior (p. 373)
  • Are There Noncriminal Psychopaths? (p. 375)
  • The Treatment of Psychopaths (p. 376)
  • Are There Psychopathic Children? (p. 376)
  • An Alternative to Traditional Clinical Diagnostics: The Antisocial Personality Pattern (p. 378)
  • The Sex Offender (p. 380)
  • Incidence of Sex Crimes (p. 380)
  • How Unique are Sex Offenders? (p. 381)
  • Risk Factors for Sexual Offending (p. 383)
  • The Treatment of Sex Offenders (p. 386)
  • Human Hunters and Predators (p. 389)
  • Stalkers (p. 390)
  • Domestic Stalkers (p. 392)
  • Serial Killers (p. 393)
  • Summary (p. 396)
  • Chapter 10 PCC: Applications in Related Areas (p. 397)
  • Domestic Violence Against Women (p. 397)
  • Men Who Batter Their Partners (p. 399)
  • Treatment of Male Batterers (p. 405)
  • Substance Abuse (p. 410)
  • Community Policing (p. 417)
  • Closing Remarks (p. 422)
  • Chapter 11 A General Personality and Social Psychology of Criminal Conduct (p. 423)
  • What is Known Within the General Social Psychology of Crime (p. 428)
  • Who Has the Power to Promote Human Service in Prevention and Corrections? (p. 435)
  • Conclusion (p. 437)
  • References (p. 441)
  • Author Index (p. 505)
  • Subject Index (p. 521)

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