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General economic history / Max Weber; introd. Ira J. Cohen; trad. Frank H. Knight

Main Author Weber, Max, 1864-1920 Secondary Author Cohen, Ira J.
Knight, Frank H.
Country Estados Unidos. Publication New Brunswick : Transaction Publishers, imp. 1995 Description LXXXIII, 401 p. : il. ; 23 cm ISBN 0-87855-690-7 CDU 19 WEBER 930.9:33(091) 33(091):930.9
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 19 WEBER - W Available 207290
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In General Economic History Max Weber focuses on the industrial enterprise for the provision of everyday wants, oriented toward profitability by means of rational capital accounting, as the institutional foundation of modern Western capitalism. This type of enterprise integrates into one institutional complex a constellation of six factors, including: formally free labor; free market trade; appropriation of the physical means of production; rational commercial practices; rational production of technology; and calculable law adjudicated and administered by the state. General Economic History traces the historical development of each of these factors from their informal rational points of origin through the feudal era to their emergence as formal rational elements in the modern capitalist industrial enterprise. The chapters on the history of modern citizenship and the modern rational state are of special significance as otherwise unavailable resources for an integrated view of Weber's work.The new introduction by Ira J. Cohen is an original scholarly work of interest to all who study Max Weber's conception of modern Western capitalism.Theessay situates the institutional and cultural aspects of Weber's view of modern capitalism in the context of his overall vision of the emergence of formal rationality in the Western world. Both aspects of modern capitalism are shown to be defined by economic formal rationality, a type of orientation which is distinct from the legal formal rationality characteristic of Weber's conception of modern bureaucracy.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Part 1 "Household, Clan, Village And Manor"
  • The Zadruga
  • "East Germany, Austria"
  • Prussia
  • Russia
  • The present agrarian organization
  • "Inheritance law, primogeniture"
  • Fidei-commissa and entails
  • "Political results of the break-up of feudalism, landed aristocracies"
  • Private property in land
  • Part 2 Industry And Mining Down To The Beginning Of The Capitalistic Development
  • Chapter VII Principal Forms Of The Economic Organiztion Of Industry
  • Vestiges of Roman field divisions
  • Scope of the concept of industry
  • Types of raw material transformation
  • "Industry in the house community, division of labor between the sexes"
  • Specialization and communal labor
  • Skilled trades
  • Relation of the worker to the market
  • To the job
  • To the place of work
  • To the fixed investment
  • Chapter VIII Stages In The Development Of Industry And Mining
  • Origin and dissolution of the Germanic agrarian system
  • House industry and tribal industry
  • "Types of inter-group specialization, castes"
  • "Local specialization, demiurgical labor"
  • Specialization in village industry and on the feudal manor (Fronhof)
  • On the estate or oikos
  • "Transition to production to order and for the market, the worker as labor power or as rent-payer"
  • Shop industry and ergasterion
  • "Differences in the labor organization of antiquity and of the middle ages, slavery"
  • Medieval craftsmen and the town
  • And Industrial Organizations
  • The Celtic agrarian organization
  • Chapter IX The Craft Guilds
  • The nature of the guild
  • Unfree guilds
  • Ritualistic guilds
  • "Guild policy, internal"
  • External
  • Later products of guild policy
  • Chapter X The Origin Of The European Guilds
  • The manorial law theory
  • Criticized
  • "The Russian Mir, its effects on economic life and its origin"
  • Production of skilled craftsmen by the feudal manor
  • Free and unfree craftsmen
  • "Guild, town and town lord"
  • Obstacles to development of shop industry into the modern factory in various countries
  • Chapter XIII Mining Prior To The Development Of Modern Capitalism
  • Mining the first field industrialized
  • Legal problems
  • "History of mining law and of mining, earliest mining outside the occident"
  • Greece
  • Rome and the middle ages
  • The Dutch-East-Indian field system
  • Germany
  • Other western countries
  • Periods in the history of German mining in the middle ages
  • Development of industrial forms down to the appearance of modern capitalism
  • Smelteries
  • The ore trade
  • Coal mining
  • Part 3 Commerce And Exchange In The Pre-Capitalistic Age
  • Chapter XIV Points Of Departure In The Development Of Commerce
  • Oldest trade that between ethnic groups
  • Chinese agrarian organization
  • Peddling
  • Trading castes
  • The Jews as an outcast commercial class
  • Seigniorial trade and its varieties
  • Gift trade and trade of princes
  • Chapter XV Technical Requisites For The Transportation Of Goods
  • Primitive transport conditions
  • Land transport and its primitive possibilities
  • Water transport
  • Navigation
  • Indian agrarian organization
  • Development of sailing
  • Chapter XVI Forms Of Organization Of Transportation And Of Commerce
  • A The Alien Trader
  • Ocean commerce and piracy
  • Merchant shipping of princes and private persons in the ancient world
  • Roman conditions
  • Shipping and mercantile organization in Greece and Rome
  • Legal forms of commerce
  • Sea loans in antiquity
  • Medieval conditions
  • The German Gehöferschaft
  • Shipping partnerships and sea loans
  • Commenda and societas maris
  • The turnover of medieval sea trade
  • Land commerce means of transport
  • "Turnover, duration of voyage and commercial organization"
  • Inland shipping in the middle ages
  • "Protection of the merchant, safe conduct"
  • "Legal protection, reprisal, proxenia, hostage, the hanse"
  • Settlements of merchants
  • Market organization
  • The theory of primitive agrarian communism
  • B The Resident Trader
  • Town origin of the resident merchant
  • Stages in the development
  • Retail trade dominant in medieval commerce
  • Struggles of the resident trader for monopoly of the town market
  • "For internal equality of opportunity, prohibition of forestalling, right of sharing"
  • Street and staple compulsion
  • Struggles with consumers
  • Beginnings of wholesale trade
  • C The Trade of the Fairs
  • Chapter I Agricultural Organization And The Problem Of Agrarian Communism
  • Primitive Agriculture
  • Nature of the fair
  • The fairs of Champagne
  • Other fairs
  • Chapter XVII Forms Of Commercial Enterprise
  • Calculability and association of interest
  • "Position numerals, accounting and the trading company"
  • The commenda as occasional enterprise
  • Origin of permanent organization for commercial enterprise
  • "Credit and the means of guaranteeing it, house-community and joint liability"
  • Separation of the property of the company
  • Chapter II Property Systems And Social Groups
  • The commandite
  • Hanseatic company forms
  • Chapter XVIII Mercantile Guilds
  • Nature of the mercantile guild
  • "Local guilds of foreigners in the west, the hanses"
  • Guilds of resident traders in China and India
  • In the West
  • History of the occidental guilds
  • "Commercial policies of guilds, especially the German Hanse"
  • Chapter XIX Money And Monetary History
  • A Forms of Appropriation
  • Money and private property
  • "The functions of money, money as means of payment only, domestic money"
  • Money as means of accumulation and mark of class distinction
  • Money as a general medium of exchange
  • Varieties of money
  • Valuation of different forms
  • The precious metals as the basis of the monetary system
  • Coinage
  • Technique of coining
  • Metallic standards
  • B The House Community and the Clan
  • "History of gold and silver values, easterrn Asia and the ancient east"
  • Rome and the middle ages
  • Coinage debasement in the middle ages
  • Free coinage
  • Increase in overseas production of the precious metals from the 16th century
  • Obstacles to the rationalization of money
  • Modern monetary policies
  • Chapter XX Banking And Dealings In Money In The Pre-Capitalistic Age
  • Character of the oldest banking transactions
  • Banking in Rome
  • The small-family
  • Temple banks and state monopolization of banking in antiquity
  • Functions of the medieval bank
  • "Liquidity, establishment of banking monopolies"
  • The bill of exchange
  • "Banking in England, the Bank of England"
  • "Banking ouside of Europe, China and India"
  • Chapter XXI Interests In The Pre-Capitalistic Period
  • Absence or prohibition of interest in early society
  • "Evasion of the prohibition, the chattel loan"
  • "Medieval methods of meeting the need for credit, ecclesiastical prohibition of interest"
  • The socialistic theory of the origin of marriage
  • The role of the Jews
  • Of Protestantism
  • Part 4 The Origin Of Modern Capitalism
  • Chapter XXII The Meaning And Presuppositions Of Modern Capitalism
  • Capitalism a method of provision for want satisfaction
  • Capitalistic supply of everyday requirements peculiar to the occident
  • General requisites for the existence of capitalism
  • Calculable Law
  • Chapter XXIII The External Facts In The Evolutiion Of Capitalism
  • Commercialization
  • Prostitution
  • "The stock company, warloans"
  • "Financing of commercial undertakings, the regulated company"
  • The great colonial companies
  • "Financing by the state, administration without a budget, tax farming"
  • "The exechequer, the special-levy system"
  • Monopolies
  • Chapter XXIV The First Great Speculative Crises
  • Speculation and Crises
  • The tulip craze
  • John Law
  • Sexual freedom and its forms
  • "England, the South Sea Company"
  • Later speculative crises
  • "Capital creation, the age of iron"
  • Chapter XXV Free Wholesale Trade
  • "Separation of wholesale from retail trade in the 18th century, forms of wholesale organization"
  • The fair and the exchange
  • News service and the wholesale trade
  • Commercial organization and transportation
  • Chapter XXVI Colonial Policy From The Sixteenth To The Eighteenth Century
  • Accumulation
  • Other historical stages of sexual life in the socialistic theory
  • Rise of cities in the east prevented by
  • Legitimate marriage under patriarchal law and its contrasts
  • The German agrarian organization
  • C The Evolution of the Family as Conditioned by Economic and non-Economic Factors
  • Primitive economic life; the theory of the three economic stages
  • Division of labor between the sexes and types of communalization
  • The men's house
  • The struggle between patriarchal and matriarchal law
  • Group marriage
  • Patriarchal authority of the man
  • D The Evolution of the Clan
  • Types of clans
  • Organized and unorganized clans
  • Settlement relations
  • History of the clan
  • Prophecy and the clan
  • Bureaucracy and the clan
  • E Evolution of the House Community
  • The primitive house community and property relations
  • Development into other forms of economic organization
  • The patriarchal house community
  • Its dissolution
  • Monogamy as the exclusive marriage form
  • Chapter III The Origin Of Seigniorial Proprietorship
  • Property relations
  • The small-family as point of departure
  • Roots of seigniorial proprietorship: Chieftainship
  • "Conquest of hostile populations, commendation, seigniorial land-settlement and leasing"
  • Magical charism
  • Individual trade
  • "Fiscal roots of seigniorial proprietorship, various forms"
  • "Individual trade of princes, irrigation culture of the modern orient"
  • Oikos-economy
  • Taxation systems of princes
  • Methods of exploiting the taxing power
  • Class relationships in the peasantry
  • Delegation of taxation to chieftain or landed proprietor
  • Seigniorial proprietorship in colonial regions
  • "The occidental, Japanese and Russian feudal systems"
  • Chapter IV The Manor
  • Conditions back of the development of the manor
  • Immunity and judicial authority
  • Precaria and beneficium
  • The manorial holding (Fronhof)
  • "Political ("socage") district (Bannbezirk) and manorial law"
  • Freedom and unfreedom of the peasant
  • Spread of the Germanic settlement form
  • "Exploitation of the peasant by rent exactions, forms of these"
  • Chapter V The Position Of The Peasants In Various Western Countries Before The Entrance Of Capitalism
  • France
  • Italy
  • Germany
  • England
  • Chapter VI Capitalistic Development Of The Manor
  • A The Plantation
  • Types of plantations
  • Plantations in antiquity
  • Westphalia
  • The southern states of the U.S.A
  • B Estate Economy
  • Types of estates
  • Stock raising without capital or with little capital
  • Intensive capitalistic pastoral economy
  • Cereal production in England
  • Russia
  • "Germany, the west"
  • "The east and "hereditary dependency"
  • Organization of an east-Elbe estate
  • Alpine economy
  • Poland and White Russia
  • C The Dissolution of the Manorial System
  • Causes and Processes of liberation of land and peasant
  • Various countries: China
  • "India, the near east"
  • Japan
  • Greece and Rome
  • England
  • France
  • South and west Germany

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology. (Bowker Author Biography)

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