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Victimology / William G. Doerner, Steven P. Lab

Main Author Doerner, William G. Coauthor Lab, Steven P. Country Estados Unidos. Publication Cincinnati, Ohio : Anderson Publishing, 1995 Description XIII, 268 p. ; 26 cm ISBN 0-87084-200-5 CDU 343.988
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Holdings
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
Monografia Biblioteca Geral da Universidade do Minho
BGUM 343.988 - D Available 174972

Licenciatura em Criminologia e Justiça Criminal Vitimologia 2º semestre

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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This breakthrough work provides an organizing structure for the history and current state of the field of victimology, and outlines the reasons compelling a separate focus on crime victims. Highly readable, "Victimology" explores the role of victimology in today s criminal justice system, examining the consequences of victimization and the various remedies now available for victims. A new chapter covers the important implications of restorative justice. The text is supplemented by illustrative figures and tables as well as learning objectives, key terms and a listing of related Internet sites.
Learning objectives, key terms, internet sites, and illustrative figures and tables enhance the text.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Figures (p. xiii)
  • List of Tables (p. xvii)
  • Chapter 1 The Scope of Victimology (p. 1)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • The Victim Throughout History (p. 1)
  • The Reemergence of the Victim (p. 3)
  • Empirical Studies of Victim Precipitation (p. 9)
  • A New Approach: General Victimology (p. 13)
  • Critical Victimology (p. 16)
  • The Victim Movement (p. 17)
  • Summary and Overview of This Book (p. 21)
  • Key Terms (p. 23)
  • Chapter 2 Gauging the Extent of Criminal Victimization (p. 25)
  • Introduction (p. 25)
  • The Uniform Crime Reports (p. 26)
  • Statistics from the UCR (p. 27)
  • Victimization Surveys (p. 30)
  • Statistics from the NCVS (p. 43)
  • Repeat Victimization (p. 48)
  • Summary (p. 51)
  • Key Terms (p. 51)
  • Chapter 3 The Costs of Being a Victim (p. 53)
  • Introduction (p. 53)
  • The Consequences of Victimization (p. 54)
  • Prosecutorial-Based Victim-Witness Projects (p. 63)
  • Beyond the Prosecutor's Office (p. 72)
  • Dissenting Voices (p. 76)
  • Summary (p. 79)
  • Key Terms (p. 79)
  • Chapter 4 Remedying the Plight of Victims (p. 81)
  • Introduction (p. 81)
  • Offender Restitution (p. 82)
  • Civil Litigation (p. 89)
  • Private Insurance (p. 93)
  • Victim Compensation (p. 93)
  • Does Victim Compensation Work? (p. 101)
  • Summary (p. 106)
  • Key Terms (p. 106)
  • Chapter 5 Sexual Assault (p. 109)
  • Introduction (p. 109)
  • Defining Sexual Assault (p. 110)
  • Measuring the Extent of Rape (p. 113)
  • Theories of Sexual Assault (p. 121)
  • The Aftermath of Rape (p. 126)
  • Legal Reforms (p. 130)
  • The Impact of Legal Reform (p. 138)
  • Responding to Sexual Assault Victims (p. 140)
  • Summary (p. 147)
  • Key Terms (p. 147)
  • Chapter 6 Spouse Abuse (p. 149)
  • Introduction (p. 149)
  • A Brief History of Spousal Violence (p. 150)
  • The Extent of Spousal Violence (p. 152)
  • Theories of Spouse Abuse (p. 156)
  • Police Intervention (p. 161)
  • The Minneapolis Experiment (p. 165)
  • Reaction to the Minneapolis Experiment (p. 167)
  • The Minneapolis Experiment Replications (p. 173)
  • Prosecutorial and Judicial Action (p. 175)
  • Coordinating System Approaches (p. 181)
  • More Recent Responses (p. 183)
  • Summary (p. 195)
  • Key Terms (p. 196)
  • Chapter 7 Child Maltreatment (p. 199)
  • Introduction (p. 199)
  • The Discovery of Child Maltreatment (p. 199)
  • Understanding the Discovery of Child Maltreatment (p. 201)
  • A Survey of Child Maltreatment Laws (p. 202)
  • The Incidence of Child Maltreatment (p. 210)
  • Some Characteristics of Maltreated Children (p. 213)
  • Theories of Child Maltreatment (p. 214)
  • Some Coping Strategies (p. 218)
  • Summary (p. 231)
  • Key Terms (p. 231)
  • Chapter 8 Elder Abuse (p. 233)
  • Introduction (p. 233)
  • Defining the Elderly (p. 234)
  • Criminal Victimization of the Elderly (p. 234)
  • Fear of Crime (p. 236)
  • Elder Abuse and Neglect (p. 241)
  • The Incidence of Elder Maltreatment (p. 246)
  • Some Characteristics of Victims and Offenders (p. 249)
  • Institutional Abuse (p. 251)
  • Theories of Elder Abuse and Neglect (p. 253)
  • Responding to Elder Abuse and Neglect (p. 257)
  • Summary (p. 260)
  • Key Terms (p. 261)
  • Chapter 9 Homicide (p. 263)
  • Introduction (p. 263)
  • The Extent of Homicide Victimization (p. 264)
  • Theories of Homicide Victimization (p. 271)
  • Survivors of Homicide Victimization (p. 285)
  • Summary (p. 290)
  • Key Terms (p. 291)
  • Chapter 10 Victimization at Work and School (p. 293)
  • Introduction (p. 293)
  • Victimization at Work (p. 294)
  • Victimization at School (p. 307)
  • Sexual Harassment (p. 318)
  • Summary (p. 324)
  • Key Terms (p. 325)
  • Chapter 11 Victim Rights (p. 327)
  • Introduction (p. 327)
  • Victim Rights Amendment (p. 328)
  • Victim Rights Legislation (p. 336)
  • The Effect of Victim Rights Legislation (p. 346)
  • Victim Impact Statements (p. 346)
  • Informal Victim Participation (p. 350)
  • Some Closing Thoughts (p. 355)
  • Summary (p. 357)
  • Key Terms (p. 358)
  • References (p. 359)
  • Subject Index (p. 407)
  • Author Index (p. 415)

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